Applying lessons from the U.S. botanical capacity assessment project to achieve 2020 global strategy for plant conservation targets

Andrea T. Kramer, Barbara Zorn-Arnold, Kayri Havens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the fundamental role plant science plays in addressing global environmental issues, a recent survey of nearly 1600 members of the botanical community in the United States revealed a severe shortage in the nation's botanical capacity or resource capabilities that support the advancement of plant science. The survey and a subsequent published report detailed shortages of botanists at government agencies, a wave of upcoming retirements, and an alarming decline in botanical degree programs and course offerings at the nation's colleges and universities. Private sector organizations are filling gaps in botanical capacity created by declines in academic and government sectors. While this survey was carried out in the United States, its results are internationally relevant and applicable. These declines occur as the need for botanical capacity increases globally to address important plant conservation needs. Recognizing the critical situation facing the world's flora, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) adopted the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) to halt the continuing loss of plant diversity. Our results illustrate the necessity of working across public and private sectors to ensure that botanical capacity is valued, supported, and utilized to achieve all 16 targets of the GSPC by 2020.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-179
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

Keywords

  • Botanical capacity
  • Global Partnership for Plant Conservation
  • Global Strategy for Plant Conservation
  • U.S.A.
  • and management
  • plant scienceeducation
  • research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Plant Science

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