Appropriateness of Beta-Lactam Allergy Record Updates After an Allergy Service Consult

Bryan G. Shaw, Inela Masic, Nancy Gorgi, Niree Kalfayan, Elise M. Gilbert, Viktorija O. Barr, Michael G Ison, Milena M. McLaughlin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many patients with a self-reported penicillin allergy go on to tolerate beta-lactam antibiotics. Allergy specialists may be consulted to determine the nature and extent of the allergy. However, electronic allergy records must be appropriately updated such that recommendations are carried forward. Objective: To determine the percentage of patients who have their electronic allergy record updated after an allergy service consult (ASC). Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients with at least 1 documented beta-lactam allergy and had an ASC during (inpatient) or prior to (outpatient) hospital admission at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Results: Within the study period, a total of 26 526 patients were identified as having a documented antibiotic allergy, with 21 657 patients (81.6% of patients with allergies) having a listed beta-lactam allergy. Of these patients, 1689 (7.8%) patients were identified as having an ASC during or prior to admission, with 598 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Changes in the allergy record were recommended by the ASC for 62% (n = 371) of patients; however, the allergy record was updated after the ASC in 74.9% (n = 278) of patients. Conclusion: ASC recommendations to delabel a patient as beta-lactam allergic must result in updating the allergy record in order to optimize future treatment. Given the low proportion of allergy-labeled patients tested, programs outside formal ASCs should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pharmacy Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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beta-Lactams
Hypersensitivity
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • allergy
  • allergy service consult
  • antibiotics
  • antimicrobial stewardship
  • beta-lactam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Shaw, B. G., Masic, I., Gorgi, N., Kalfayan, N., Gilbert, E. M., Barr, V. O., ... McLaughlin, M. M. (Accepted/In press). Appropriateness of Beta-Lactam Allergy Record Updates After an Allergy Service Consult. Journal of Pharmacy Practice. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190018797767
Shaw, Bryan G. ; Masic, Inela ; Gorgi, Nancy ; Kalfayan, Niree ; Gilbert, Elise M. ; Barr, Viktorija O. ; Ison, Michael G ; McLaughlin, Milena M. / Appropriateness of Beta-Lactam Allergy Record Updates After an Allergy Service Consult. In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2018.
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abstract = "Background: Many patients with a self-reported penicillin allergy go on to tolerate beta-lactam antibiotics. Allergy specialists may be consulted to determine the nature and extent of the allergy. However, electronic allergy records must be appropriately updated such that recommendations are carried forward. Objective: To determine the percentage of patients who have their electronic allergy record updated after an allergy service consult (ASC). Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients with at least 1 documented beta-lactam allergy and had an ASC during (inpatient) or prior to (outpatient) hospital admission at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Results: Within the study period, a total of 26 526 patients were identified as having a documented antibiotic allergy, with 21 657 patients (81.6{\%} of patients with allergies) having a listed beta-lactam allergy. Of these patients, 1689 (7.8{\%}) patients were identified as having an ASC during or prior to admission, with 598 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Changes in the allergy record were recommended by the ASC for 62{\%} (n = 371) of patients; however, the allergy record was updated after the ASC in 74.9{\%} (n = 278) of patients. Conclusion: ASC recommendations to delabel a patient as beta-lactam allergic must result in updating the allergy record in order to optimize future treatment. Given the low proportion of allergy-labeled patients tested, programs outside formal ASCs should be considered.",
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Appropriateness of Beta-Lactam Allergy Record Updates After an Allergy Service Consult. / Shaw, Bryan G.; Masic, Inela; Gorgi, Nancy; Kalfayan, Niree; Gilbert, Elise M.; Barr, Viktorija O.; Ison, Michael G; McLaughlin, Milena M.

In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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