Aqueous humor formation in fish: The role of sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase in the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) eye

Lee M. Jampol*, John N. Forrest

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The anatomy of the fish ciliary body and the distribution of sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase in the elasmobranch (Squalus acanthias) eye were studied in an attempt to localize the site of formation of aqueous humor. Both teleosts and elasmobranchs have a ciliary body with a nonpigmented and pigmented epithelium similar to the mammalian pars plana. The fish ciliary body has no processes and little or no smooth muscle. Sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase was found in significant levels in the elasmobranch retina, ciliary body and brain, while the iris had little activity. If the elasmobranch eye is similar to the mammalian eye and sodium transport is involved in aqueous humor formation, the ciliary body seems the most likely site of transport.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-318,IN27-IN35,319
JournalExperimental eye research
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1972

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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