Aqueous vasopressin infusion during chemotherapy in patients with diabetes insipidus

William P. Bryant, Aengus S. O'Marcaigh, Gregory A. Ledger, Donald Zimmerman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Patients who have suprasellar germinomas in childhood often present with central diabetes insipidus (CDI). The authors investigated the use of aqueous vasopressin (AVP) by continuous infusion to control the fluid and electrolyte balance in germinoma patients with CDI during aggressive fluid hydration as a part of a preirradiation chemotherapy protocol. Methods. Three patients with suprasellar germinomas and CDI were treated with four courses of preirradiation chemotherapy. Two patients were treated with a continuous AVP infusion at an initial rate of 0.08‐0.10 mU/kg per hour during hydration. Fluid intake, urine output, body weight, urine specific gravity, and serum electrolyte concentrations were monitored closely, and the infusion rate was adjusted accordingly. Results. Very low dose AVP infusion controlled fluid balance while allowing appropriate diuresis during chemotherapy. Fluid intake and output were markedly less in the AVP‐treated patients (3.8 L/m2 per day) than in the untreated patient (20 L/m2 per day). Conclusions. The use of very low dose AVP infusion at an initial rate of 0.08‐0.10 mU/kg per hour during hydration therapy allowed easily titratable control of fluid and electrolyte balance in the patients studied and avoided the complications associated with desmopressin acetate antidiuresis or withholding antidiuretic treatment altogether.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2589-2592
Number of pages4
JournalCancer
Volume74
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1994

Keywords

  • aqueous vasopressin
  • desmopressin acetate
  • diabetes insipidus
  • germinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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