Are Experiences of Discrimination Related to Poorer Dietary Intakes Among South Asians in the MASALA Study?

Sarah Nadimpalli*, Akilah Keita, Jeremy Wang, Alka Kanaya, Namratha Kandula, Kim M. Gans, Sameera Talegawkar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To examine associations between self-reported discrimination and dietary intakes among South Asian (SA) people. Methods Data from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America study were used to analyze the relationship between self-reported discrimination and dietary behaviors (n = 866). Self-reported discrimination was measured with the 9-item continuous Everyday Discrimination Scale. Diet was measured with a culturally tailored, validated, 163-item food frequency questionnaire for SA individuals. Dietary variables examined in these analyses included weekly consumption of fruits and vegetables and sweets. The researchers employed multiple logistic and linear regression models. Results Self-reported discrimination was unrelated to fruit and vegetable intake but was positively associated with consumption of sweets per week (P = .001). Conclusions and Implications Increased consumption of sweets may be a mechanism for SA individuals to cope with stressful experiences of discrimination. Further research examining discrimination and health behavior-related coping strategies among SA people is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)872-876.e1
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume49
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Keywords

  • South Asian
  • coping
  • diet
  • discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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