Are people prejudiced against women? some answers from research on attitudes, gender stereotypes, and judgments of competence

Alice H. Eagly*, Antonio Mladinic

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

261 Scopus citations

Abstract

In contemporary research, attitudes toward women appear to be more positive than those toward men in samples of US and Canadian university students, and the evaluative content of the female stereotype is more favorable than the evaluative content of the male stereotype. These research findings on attitudes and stereotypes are compared with the findings of Goldberg-paradigm experiments on judgments of women's and men's competence, which are commonly thought to reflect people's attitudes and stereotypes. Although research on competence judgments has not shown a pervasive tendency to devalue women's work, it has demonstrated prejudice against women in masculine domains (e.g. male-dominated jobs, male-stereotypic behavior). This targeted form of prejudice is consistent with the generally more favorable evaluation of women than men obtained in attitude and stereotype studies because this positive evaluation derives primarily from the ascription to women of nice, nurturant, communal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-35
Number of pages35
JournalEuropean Review of Social Psychology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Are people prejudiced against women? some answers from research on attitudes, gender stereotypes, and judgments of competence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this