Are there "his" and "hers" types of interdependence? The implications of gender differences in collective yersus relational interdependence for affect, behavior, and cognition

Shira Gabriel*, Wendi L Gardner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In a recent review, S.E.Cross and L.Madson (1997) forwarded that many gender differences in social experience and behavior may be better understood through consideration of gender differences in independence and interdependence. In the current studies, an expansion of the model to include both relational and collective aspects of interdependence was investigated (see R.F. Baumeister & K.L.Sommer, 1997). On the basis of the literature regarding gender differences in affect, behavior, and cognition, it was hypothesized that women would focus more on the relational aspects of interdependence, whereas men would focus more on the collective aspects of interdependence. Five studies in which gender differences in self-construals, emotional experience, selective memory, and behavioral intentions were examined supported the expansion of the model to Include both relational and collective aspects of interdependence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClose Relationships
Subtitle of host publicationKey Readings
PublisherPsychology Press
Pages488-508
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)0863775950, 9780203311851
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 18 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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