Are there "his" and "hers" types of interdependence? The implications of gender differences in collective versus relational interdependence for affect, behavior, and cognition

Shira Gabriel*, Wendi L Gardner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

385 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a recent review, S. E. Cross and L. Madson (1997) forwarded that many gender differences in social experience and behavior may be better understood through consideration of gender differences in independence and interdependence. In the current studies an expansion of the model to include both relational and collective aspects of interdependence was investigated (see R. F. Baumeister & K. L. Sommer, 1997). On the basis of the literature regarding gender differences in affect, behavior, and cognition, it was hypothesized that women would focus more on the relational aspects of interdependence, whereas men would focus more on the collective aspects of interdependence. Five studies in which gender differences in self-construals, emotional experience, selective memory, and behavioral intentions were examined supported the expansion of the model to include both relational and collective aspects of interdependence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-655
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume77
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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