Arterial bullet embolism resulting in delayed vascular insufficiency: A rationale for mandatory extraction

Patrick A. Adegboyega*, Nedjema Sustento-Reodica, Adekunle Adesokan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper reports a case of migrating intravascular bullet embolus that initially produced no symptoms but resulted in an above-knee amputation 14 months after its entry into a peripheral artery. The missile entered through a penetrating gunshot wound to the abdominal aorta and later became lodged in the left popliteal artery. However, the bullet fragment migrated further into the posterior tibial artery with consequent vascular insufficiency requiring a supracondylar amputation of the left lower extremity 14 months later. Emphasis is placed on the need for a high index of suspicion for bullet embolism, aggressive search for any bullets unaccounted for, and early surgical removal of all confirmed arterial emboli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-541
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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