Assessing cognitive function and capacity in older adults with cancer

June M McKoy*, Peggy S. Burhenn, Ilene S. Browner, Kari L. Loeser, Katrina M. Tulas, Megan R. Oden, Randall W. Rupper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The number of older individuals with cancer is increasing exponentially, mandating that oncologists contemplate more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approaches to treatment of this cohort. Recruitment of assessment instruments validated in older patients can be invaluable for guiding treatment and decision-making by both patients and providers, and can arguably contribute to improving outcomes and health-related quality of life. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment is one such validated instrument that can be used by oncologists to assess patient readiness and appropriateness for prescribed cancer therapy. As a multidisciplinary diagnostic and treatment process, it comprises functional status, cognitive status, social support, and advance care preferences, and is an ideal instrument for evaluating complex older individuals. It is well established that many older individuals with cancer travel with multiple comorbid illnesses, including cognitive impairment, and when presented with a cancer diagnosis struggle to choose from multiple treatment options. In addition to the complete medical history, the ability of patients to decide on a course of therapy in concert with their oncologist is critically important. Alternatively, many oncologists are conflicted as to whether true informed consent for treatment can be obtained from many older patients. Having a roadmap to decision-making capacity is therefore an inescapable imperative in geriatric oncology, because careful attention must be directed at identifying older patients with cancer who might benefit from these assessments and the individualized treatment plans that emerge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-144
Number of pages7
JournalJNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Cognition
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Decision Making
Geriatric Assessment
Aptitude
Informed Consent
Social Support
Geriatrics
Quality of Life
Oncologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

McKoy, J. M., Burhenn, P. S., Browner, I. S., Loeser, K. L., Tulas, K. M., Oden, M. R., & Rupper, R. W. (2014). Assessing cognitive function and capacity in older adults with cancer. JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 12(1), 138-144. https://doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2014.0011
McKoy, June M ; Burhenn, Peggy S. ; Browner, Ilene S. ; Loeser, Kari L. ; Tulas, Katrina M. ; Oden, Megan R. ; Rupper, Randall W. / Assessing cognitive function and capacity in older adults with cancer. In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 138-144.
@article{cb6ee1ba848e4bdb93befe630bd8282d,
title = "Assessing cognitive function and capacity in older adults with cancer",
abstract = "The number of older individuals with cancer is increasing exponentially, mandating that oncologists contemplate more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approaches to treatment of this cohort. Recruitment of assessment instruments validated in older patients can be invaluable for guiding treatment and decision-making by both patients and providers, and can arguably contribute to improving outcomes and health-related quality of life. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment is one such validated instrument that can be used by oncologists to assess patient readiness and appropriateness for prescribed cancer therapy. As a multidisciplinary diagnostic and treatment process, it comprises functional status, cognitive status, social support, and advance care preferences, and is an ideal instrument for evaluating complex older individuals. It is well established that many older individuals with cancer travel with multiple comorbid illnesses, including cognitive impairment, and when presented with a cancer diagnosis struggle to choose from multiple treatment options. In addition to the complete medical history, the ability of patients to decide on a course of therapy in concert with their oncologist is critically important. Alternatively, many oncologists are conflicted as to whether true informed consent for treatment can be obtained from many older patients. Having a roadmap to decision-making capacity is therefore an inescapable imperative in geriatric oncology, because careful attention must be directed at identifying older patients with cancer who might benefit from these assessments and the individualized treatment plans that emerge.",
author = "McKoy, {June M} and Burhenn, {Peggy S.} and Browner, {Ilene S.} and Loeser, {Kari L.} and Tulas, {Katrina M.} and Oden, {Megan R.} and Rupper, {Randall W.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.6004/jnccn.2014.0011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "138--144",
journal = "Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN",
issn = "1540-1405",
publisher = "Cold Spring Publishing LLC",
number = "1",

}

Assessing cognitive function and capacity in older adults with cancer. / McKoy, June M; Burhenn, Peggy S.; Browner, Ilene S.; Loeser, Kari L.; Tulas, Katrina M.; Oden, Megan R.; Rupper, Randall W.

In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 138-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing cognitive function and capacity in older adults with cancer

AU - McKoy, June M

AU - Burhenn, Peggy S.

AU - Browner, Ilene S.

AU - Loeser, Kari L.

AU - Tulas, Katrina M.

AU - Oden, Megan R.

AU - Rupper, Randall W.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The number of older individuals with cancer is increasing exponentially, mandating that oncologists contemplate more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approaches to treatment of this cohort. Recruitment of assessment instruments validated in older patients can be invaluable for guiding treatment and decision-making by both patients and providers, and can arguably contribute to improving outcomes and health-related quality of life. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment is one such validated instrument that can be used by oncologists to assess patient readiness and appropriateness for prescribed cancer therapy. As a multidisciplinary diagnostic and treatment process, it comprises functional status, cognitive status, social support, and advance care preferences, and is an ideal instrument for evaluating complex older individuals. It is well established that many older individuals with cancer travel with multiple comorbid illnesses, including cognitive impairment, and when presented with a cancer diagnosis struggle to choose from multiple treatment options. In addition to the complete medical history, the ability of patients to decide on a course of therapy in concert with their oncologist is critically important. Alternatively, many oncologists are conflicted as to whether true informed consent for treatment can be obtained from many older patients. Having a roadmap to decision-making capacity is therefore an inescapable imperative in geriatric oncology, because careful attention must be directed at identifying older patients with cancer who might benefit from these assessments and the individualized treatment plans that emerge.

AB - The number of older individuals with cancer is increasing exponentially, mandating that oncologists contemplate more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approaches to treatment of this cohort. Recruitment of assessment instruments validated in older patients can be invaluable for guiding treatment and decision-making by both patients and providers, and can arguably contribute to improving outcomes and health-related quality of life. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment is one such validated instrument that can be used by oncologists to assess patient readiness and appropriateness for prescribed cancer therapy. As a multidisciplinary diagnostic and treatment process, it comprises functional status, cognitive status, social support, and advance care preferences, and is an ideal instrument for evaluating complex older individuals. It is well established that many older individuals with cancer travel with multiple comorbid illnesses, including cognitive impairment, and when presented with a cancer diagnosis struggle to choose from multiple treatment options. In addition to the complete medical history, the ability of patients to decide on a course of therapy in concert with their oncologist is critically important. Alternatively, many oncologists are conflicted as to whether true informed consent for treatment can be obtained from many older patients. Having a roadmap to decision-making capacity is therefore an inescapable imperative in geriatric oncology, because careful attention must be directed at identifying older patients with cancer who might benefit from these assessments and the individualized treatment plans that emerge.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893761490&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893761490&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.6004/jnccn.2014.0011

DO - 10.6004/jnccn.2014.0011

M3 - Review article

VL - 12

SP - 138

EP - 144

JO - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN

JF - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN

SN - 1540-1405

IS - 1

ER -