Assessing Wolf Motor Function Test as outcome measure for research in patients after stroke

Steven L. Wolf*, Pamela A. Catlin, Michael Ellis, Audrey Link Archer, Bryn Morgan, Aimee Piacentino

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

640 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Purpose - The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) is a new time-based method to evaluate upper extremity performance while providing insight into joint-specific and total limb movements. This study addresses selected psychometric attributes of the WMFT applied to a chronic stroke population. Methods - Nineteen individuals after stroke and with intact cognition and sitting balance were age- and sex-matched with 19 individuals without impairment. Subjects performed the WMFT and the upper extremity portion of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA) on 2 occasions (12 to 16 days apart), with scoring performed independently by 2 random raters. Results - The WMFT and FMA demonstrated agreement (P<0.0001) between raters at each session. WMFT scores for the dominant and nondominant extremities of individuals without impairment were different (P≤0.05) from the more and less affected extremities of subjects after stroke. The FMA score for the more affected extremity of subjects after stroke was different (P≤0.05) from the dominant and nondominant extremities. However, the FMA score for the less affected upper extremity of individuals after stroke was not different (P>0.05) from the dominant and nondominant extremities of individuals without impairment. The WMFT and FMA scores were related (P<0.02) for the more affected extremity in individuals after stroke. Conclusions - The interrater reliability, construct validity, and criterion validity of the WMFT, as used in these subject samples, are supported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1635-1639
Number of pages5
JournalStroke
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Arm
  • Motor activity
  • Psychometrics
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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