Assigned versus random, countermeasure-like responses in the P300 based complex trial protocol for detection of deception: Task demand effects

John B. Meixner, Alexander Haynes, Michael R. Winograd, Jordan Brown, J. Peter Rosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

We recently introduced an accurate and countermeasure resistant P300-based deception detection test called the complex trial protocol (Rosenfeld et al. in Psychophysiology 45(6):906-919, 2008). When subjects use countermeasures to all irrelevant items in the test, the probe P300 is increased rather than reduced (as it was in previous P300-based deception protocols), allowing detection of countermeasure users. The current experiment examines the role of task demand on the complex trial protocol by forcing the subject to make countermeasure-like response to stimuli. Subjects made either a simple random button response to both probe and irrelevant stimuli (experiment 1) or a more complex, assigned, button response to probe and irrelevant stimuli (experiment 2). We found that an increase in task demand reduced the effectiveness of the test. Using random responses we found a simple guilty hit rate of 11/12 with no false positives, but only a 4/11 hit rate for countermeasure-users. Using assigned responses we found a simple guilty hit rate of 8/15 with no false positives, and a 7/16 hit rate for countermeasure-users. We herein suggest that the high level of task demand associated with these countermeasure-like responses causes reduced hit rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-220
Number of pages12
JournalApplied Psychophysiology Biofeedback
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Keywords

  • CIT
  • Deception detection
  • ERP
  • GKT
  • P300
  • Task demand effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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