Association between Food Deserts and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in a Large Metropolitan Area

Grace C. Banner*, Kingsley N. Weaver, Tamara Rushovich, Sloane L. York, Lynn M. Yee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective ?The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between urban food deserts and frequency and obstetric outcomes related to gestational diabetes. Study Design ?We conducted a retrospective cohort study of singleton births in Chicago from 2010 to 2014. Birth certificate data were analyzed and geomapped by census tract. Census tracts were categorized as food deserts according to the USDA Food Access Research Atlas. The primary outcome was frequency of gestational diabetes. Secondary outcomes were assessed among women with gestational diabetes and their neonates. Results ?Of the 191,947 eligible women, 8,709 (4.5%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Those in food deserts were more likely to be younger, obese, minority race/ethnicity, and multiparous. Women in food deserts were less likely to develop gestational diabetes (3.8 vs. 4.8%, p < 0.01; adjusted odds ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.86-0.96). Women with gestational diabetes did not experience worse maternal and neonatal outcomes after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion ?In contrast to prior work, women in Chicago living within food deserts were less likely to develop gestational diabetes and did not experience poorer outcomes, suggesting environmental factors other than food access contribute to perinatal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E39-E45
JournalAmerican journal of perinatology
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021

Keywords

  • food access
  • food desert
  • gestational diabetes mellitus
  • health outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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