Association between radiation dose to organs at risk and acute patient reported outcome during radiation treatment for head and neck cancers

Mona Arbab, Yu Hui Chen, Roy B. Tishler, Lauren Gunasti, Jason Glass, Jo Ann Fugazzotto, Joseph H. Killoran, Rosh Sethi, Eleni Rettig, Donald Annino, Laura Goguen, Ravindra Uppaluri, Carolyn Hsu, Elaine Burke, Glenn J. Hanna, Jochen Lorch, Robert I. Haddad, Danielle N. Margalit*, Jonathan D. Schoenfeld

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Associations between patient-reported outcomes and dose to organs at risk (OARs) may promote management and guide future investigations. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated PROs and OAR dose in head and neck (H&N) cancer. Results: In 169 patients, we identified weak associations between: “Difficulty swallowing/chewing” and increased mean RT dose to the oral cavity, larynx, pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) and contralateral parotid; “choking/coughing” and larynx mean dose; “problems with mucus in mouth and throat” and oral cavity, contralateral parotid mean dose and parotid V30, contralateral submandibular gland and PCM mean dose; “difficulty with voice/speech” and oral cavity, contralateral parotid, contralateral submandibular gland and larynx mean dose; and “dry mouth” and ipsilateral submandibular gland, oral cavity and PCM mean dose. Conclusion: We identified weak associations between PRO and dose to OARs—these data can guide on treatment management, patient counseling, and serve as a baseline for future investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1442-1452
Number of pages11
JournalHead and Neck
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

Keywords

  • head and neck cancers
  • organs at risk
  • patient reported outcome
  • radiation dose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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