Association of accelerometry-measured physical activity and cardiovascular events in mobility-limited older adults

The LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study

for the LIFE Study Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background--Data are sparse regarding the value of physical activity (PA) surveillance among older adults-particularly among those with mobility limitations. The objective of this study was to examine longitudinal associations between objectively measured daily PA and the incidence of cardiovascular events among older adults in the LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study. Methods and Results--Cardiovascular events were adjudicated based on medical records review, and cardiovascular risk factors were controlled for in the analysis. Home-based activity data were collected by hip-worn accelerometers at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months postrandomization to either a physical activity or health education intervention. LIFE study participants (n=1590; age 78.9±5.2 [SD] years; 67.2% women) at baseline had an 11% lower incidence of experiencing a subsequent cardiovascular event per 500 steps taken per day based on activity data (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.96; P=0.001). At baseline, every 30 minutes spent performing activities ≥500 counts per minute (hazard ratio, 0.75; confidence interval, 0.65-0.89 [P=0.001]) were also associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular events. Throughout follow-up (6, 12, and 24 months), both the number of steps per day (per 500 steps; hazard ratio, 0.90, confidence interval, 0.85-0.96 [P=0.001]) and duration of activity ≥500 counts per minute (per 30 minutes; hazard ratio, 0.76; confidence interval, 0.63-0.90 [P=0.002]) were significantly associated with lower cardiovascular event rates. Conclusions--Objective measurements of physical activity via accelerometry were associated with cardiovascular events among older adults with limited mobility (summary score > 10 on the Short Physical Performance Battery) both using baseline and longitudinal data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere007215
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Accelerometry
Life Style
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Incidence
Mobility Limitation
Physical Education and Training
Health Education
Medical Records
Hip

Keywords

  • Accelerometry
  • Aging
  • Cardiovascular
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{cd62b72c2ece4c9e8064a23a05ec19f9,
title = "Association of accelerometry-measured physical activity and cardiovascular events in mobility-limited older adults: The LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study",
abstract = "Background--Data are sparse regarding the value of physical activity (PA) surveillance among older adults-particularly among those with mobility limitations. The objective of this study was to examine longitudinal associations between objectively measured daily PA and the incidence of cardiovascular events among older adults in the LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study. Methods and Results--Cardiovascular events were adjudicated based on medical records review, and cardiovascular risk factors were controlled for in the analysis. Home-based activity data were collected by hip-worn accelerometers at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months postrandomization to either a physical activity or health education intervention. LIFE study participants (n=1590; age 78.9±5.2 [SD] years; 67.2{\%} women) at baseline had an 11{\%} lower incidence of experiencing a subsequent cardiovascular event per 500 steps taken per day based on activity data (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.84-0.96; P=0.001). At baseline, every 30 minutes spent performing activities ≥500 counts per minute (hazard ratio, 0.75; confidence interval, 0.65-0.89 [P=0.001]) were also associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular events. Throughout follow-up (6, 12, and 24 months), both the number of steps per day (per 500 steps; hazard ratio, 0.90, confidence interval, 0.85-0.96 [P=0.001]) and duration of activity ≥500 counts per minute (per 30 minutes; hazard ratio, 0.76; confidence interval, 0.63-0.90 [P=0.002]) were significantly associated with lower cardiovascular event rates. Conclusions--Objective measurements of physical activity via accelerometry were associated with cardiovascular events among older adults with limited mobility (summary score > 10 on the Short Physical Performance Battery) both using baseline and longitudinal data.",
keywords = "Accelerometry, Aging, Cardiovascular, Physical activity",
author = "{for the LIFE Study Research Group} and Cochrane, {Shannon K.} and Chen, {Shyh Huei} and Fitzgerald, {Jodi D.} and Dodson, {John A.} and Fielding, {Roger A.} and King, {Abby C.} and McDermott, {Mary McGrae} and Manini, {Todd M.} and Marsh, {Anthony P.} and Newman, {Anne B.} and Marco Pahor and Catrine Tudor-Locke and Ambrosius, {Walter T.} and Buford, {Thomas W.} and Guralnik, {Jack M.} and Christiaan Leeuwenburgh and Connie Caudle and Lauren Crump and Latonia Holmes and Jocelyn Lee and Lu, {Ching Ju} and Miller, {Michael E.} and Espeland, {Mark A.} and William Applegate and Beavers, {Daniel P.} and Byington, {Robert P.} and Delilah Cook and Furberg, {Curt D.} and Harvin, {Lea N.} and Leora Henkin and John Hepler and Hsu, {Fang Chi} and Laura Lovato and Wesley Roberson and Julia Rushing and Scott Rushing and Stowe, {Cynthia L.} and Walkup, {Michael P.} and Don Hire and {Jack Rejeski}, W. and Katula, {Jeffrey A.} and Brubaker, {Peter H.} and Mihalko, {Shannon L.} and Jennings, {Janine M.} and Pierce, {June J.} and Hadley, {Evan C.} and Sergei Romashkan and Patel, {Kushang V.} and Bonnie Spring and Hauser, {Joshua M}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/JAHA.117.007215",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
journal = "Journal of the American Heart Association",
issn = "2047-9980",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of accelerometry-measured physical activity and cardiovascular events in mobility-limited older adults

T2 - The LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study

AU - for the LIFE Study Research Group

AU - Cochrane, Shannon K.

AU - Chen, Shyh Huei

AU - Fitzgerald, Jodi D.

AU - Dodson, John A.

AU - Fielding, Roger A.

AU - King, Abby C.

AU - McDermott, Mary McGrae

AU - Manini, Todd M.

AU - Marsh, Anthony P.

AU - Newman, Anne B.

AU - Pahor, Marco

AU - Tudor-Locke, Catrine

AU - Ambrosius, Walter T.

AU - Buford, Thomas W.

AU - Guralnik, Jack M.

AU - Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

AU - Caudle, Connie

AU - Crump, Lauren

AU - Holmes, Latonia

AU - Lee, Jocelyn

AU - Lu, Ching Ju

AU - Miller, Michael E.

AU - Espeland, Mark A.

AU - Applegate, William

AU - Beavers, Daniel P.

AU - Byington, Robert P.

AU - Cook, Delilah

AU - Furberg, Curt D.

AU - Harvin, Lea N.

AU - Henkin, Leora

AU - Hepler, John

AU - Hsu, Fang Chi

AU - Lovato, Laura

AU - Roberson, Wesley

AU - Rushing, Julia

AU - Rushing, Scott

AU - Stowe, Cynthia L.

AU - Walkup, Michael P.

AU - Hire, Don

AU - Jack Rejeski, W.

AU - Katula, Jeffrey A.

AU - Brubaker, Peter H.

AU - Mihalko, Shannon L.

AU - Jennings, Janine M.

AU - Pierce, June J.

AU - Hadley, Evan C.

AU - Romashkan, Sergei

AU - Patel, Kushang V.

AU - Spring, Bonnie

AU - Hauser, Joshua M

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Background--Data are sparse regarding the value of physical activity (PA) surveillance among older adults-particularly among those with mobility limitations. The objective of this study was to examine longitudinal associations between objectively measured daily PA and the incidence of cardiovascular events among older adults in the LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study. Methods and Results--Cardiovascular events were adjudicated based on medical records review, and cardiovascular risk factors were controlled for in the analysis. Home-based activity data were collected by hip-worn accelerometers at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months postrandomization to either a physical activity or health education intervention. LIFE study participants (n=1590; age 78.9±5.2 [SD] years; 67.2% women) at baseline had an 11% lower incidence of experiencing a subsequent cardiovascular event per 500 steps taken per day based on activity data (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.96; P=0.001). At baseline, every 30 minutes spent performing activities ≥500 counts per minute (hazard ratio, 0.75; confidence interval, 0.65-0.89 [P=0.001]) were also associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular events. Throughout follow-up (6, 12, and 24 months), both the number of steps per day (per 500 steps; hazard ratio, 0.90, confidence interval, 0.85-0.96 [P=0.001]) and duration of activity ≥500 counts per minute (per 30 minutes; hazard ratio, 0.76; confidence interval, 0.63-0.90 [P=0.002]) were significantly associated with lower cardiovascular event rates. Conclusions--Objective measurements of physical activity via accelerometry were associated with cardiovascular events among older adults with limited mobility (summary score > 10 on the Short Physical Performance Battery) both using baseline and longitudinal data.

AB - Background--Data are sparse regarding the value of physical activity (PA) surveillance among older adults-particularly among those with mobility limitations. The objective of this study was to examine longitudinal associations between objectively measured daily PA and the incidence of cardiovascular events among older adults in the LIFE (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders) study. Methods and Results--Cardiovascular events were adjudicated based on medical records review, and cardiovascular risk factors were controlled for in the analysis. Home-based activity data were collected by hip-worn accelerometers at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months postrandomization to either a physical activity or health education intervention. LIFE study participants (n=1590; age 78.9±5.2 [SD] years; 67.2% women) at baseline had an 11% lower incidence of experiencing a subsequent cardiovascular event per 500 steps taken per day based on activity data (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.96; P=0.001). At baseline, every 30 minutes spent performing activities ≥500 counts per minute (hazard ratio, 0.75; confidence interval, 0.65-0.89 [P=0.001]) were also associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular events. Throughout follow-up (6, 12, and 24 months), both the number of steps per day (per 500 steps; hazard ratio, 0.90, confidence interval, 0.85-0.96 [P=0.001]) and duration of activity ≥500 counts per minute (per 30 minutes; hazard ratio, 0.76; confidence interval, 0.63-0.90 [P=0.002]) were significantly associated with lower cardiovascular event rates. Conclusions--Objective measurements of physical activity via accelerometry were associated with cardiovascular events among older adults with limited mobility (summary score > 10 on the Short Physical Performance Battery) both using baseline and longitudinal data.

KW - Accelerometry

KW - Aging

KW - Cardiovascular

KW - Physical activity

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U2 - 10.1161/JAHA.117.007215

DO - 10.1161/JAHA.117.007215

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Journal of the American Heart Association

JF - Journal of the American Heart Association

SN - 2047-9980

IS - 12

M1 - e007215

ER -