Association of baseline knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness during gait and 2-year patellofemoral cartilage damage worsening in knee osteoarthritis

Alison Hsin-I Chang*, Joan S Chmiel, O. Almagor, A. Guermazi, P. V. Prasad, Kirsten C Moisio, L. Belisle, Y. Zhang, K. Hayes, Leena Sharma

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness (DJS) describes the biomechanical interaction between change in external knee flexion moment and flexion angular excursion during gait. In theory, greater DJS may particularly stress the patellofemoral (PF) compartment and thereby contribute to PF osteoarthritis (OA) worsening. We hypothesized that greater baseline knee sagittal DJS is associated with PF cartilage damage worsening 2 years later. Methods Participants all had OA in at least one knee. Knee kinematics and kinetics during gait were recorded using motion capture systems and force plates. Knee sagittal DJS was computed as the slope of the linear regression line for knee flexion moments vs angles during the loading response phase. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained at baseline and 2 years later. We assessed the association between baseline DJS and baseline-to-2-year PF cartilage damage worsening using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Our sample had 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); body mass index (BMI) 28.4 kg/m 2 (5.7); 76.5% women. Baseline knee sagittal DJS was associated with baseline-to-2-year cartilage damage worsening in the lateral (OR = 5.35, 95% CI: 2.37–12.05) and any PF (OR = 2.99, 95% CI: 1.27–7.04) compartment. Individual components of baseline DJS (i.e., change in knee moment or angle) were not associated with subsequent PF disease worsening. Conclusion Capturing the concomitant effect of knee kinetics and kinematics during gait, knee sagittal DJS is a potentially modifiable risk factor for PF disease worsening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-248
Number of pages7
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Knee Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Gait
Knee
Joints
Stiffness
Kinematics
Kinetics
Biomechanical Phenomena
Osteoarthritis
Magnetic resonance
Linear regression
Logistics
Imaging techniques
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • Gait
  • Imaging
  • Knee osteoarthritis
  • Magnetic resonance
  • Patellofemoral joint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{849feb8a1adf47309e6de1443c7ea02f,
title = "Association of baseline knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness during gait and 2-year patellofemoral cartilage damage worsening in knee osteoarthritis",
abstract = "Objective Knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness (DJS) describes the biomechanical interaction between change in external knee flexion moment and flexion angular excursion during gait. In theory, greater DJS may particularly stress the patellofemoral (PF) compartment and thereby contribute to PF osteoarthritis (OA) worsening. We hypothesized that greater baseline knee sagittal DJS is associated with PF cartilage damage worsening 2 years later. Methods Participants all had OA in at least one knee. Knee kinematics and kinetics during gait were recorded using motion capture systems and force plates. Knee sagittal DJS was computed as the slope of the linear regression line for knee flexion moments vs angles during the loading response phase. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained at baseline and 2 years later. We assessed the association between baseline DJS and baseline-to-2-year PF cartilage damage worsening using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Our sample had 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); body mass index (BMI) 28.4 kg/m 2 (5.7); 76.5{\%} women. Baseline knee sagittal DJS was associated with baseline-to-2-year cartilage damage worsening in the lateral (OR = 5.35, 95{\%} CI: 2.37–12.05) and any PF (OR = 2.99, 95{\%} CI: 1.27–7.04) compartment. Individual components of baseline DJS (i.e., change in knee moment or angle) were not associated with subsequent PF disease worsening. Conclusion Capturing the concomitant effect of knee kinetics and kinematics during gait, knee sagittal DJS is a potentially modifiable risk factor for PF disease worsening.",
keywords = "Cartilage, Gait, Imaging, Knee osteoarthritis, Magnetic resonance, Patellofemoral joint",
author = "Chang, {Alison Hsin-I} and Chmiel, {Joan S} and O. Almagor and A. Guermazi and Prasad, {P. V.} and Moisio, {Kirsten C} and L. Belisle and Y. Zhang and K. Hayes and Leena Sharma",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.joca.2016.10.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "242--248",
journal = "Osteoarthritis and Cartilage",
issn = "1063-4584",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

Association of baseline knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness during gait and 2-year patellofemoral cartilage damage worsening in knee osteoarthritis. / Chang, Alison Hsin-I; Chmiel, Joan S; Almagor, O.; Guermazi, A.; Prasad, P. V.; Moisio, Kirsten C; Belisle, L.; Zhang, Y.; Hayes, K.; Sharma, Leena.

In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 242-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of baseline knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness during gait and 2-year patellofemoral cartilage damage worsening in knee osteoarthritis

AU - Chang, Alison Hsin-I

AU - Chmiel, Joan S

AU - Almagor, O.

AU - Guermazi, A.

AU - Prasad, P. V.

AU - Moisio, Kirsten C

AU - Belisle, L.

AU - Zhang, Y.

AU - Hayes, K.

AU - Sharma, Leena

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Objective Knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness (DJS) describes the biomechanical interaction between change in external knee flexion moment and flexion angular excursion during gait. In theory, greater DJS may particularly stress the patellofemoral (PF) compartment and thereby contribute to PF osteoarthritis (OA) worsening. We hypothesized that greater baseline knee sagittal DJS is associated with PF cartilage damage worsening 2 years later. Methods Participants all had OA in at least one knee. Knee kinematics and kinetics during gait were recorded using motion capture systems and force plates. Knee sagittal DJS was computed as the slope of the linear regression line for knee flexion moments vs angles during the loading response phase. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained at baseline and 2 years later. We assessed the association between baseline DJS and baseline-to-2-year PF cartilage damage worsening using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Our sample had 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); body mass index (BMI) 28.4 kg/m 2 (5.7); 76.5% women. Baseline knee sagittal DJS was associated with baseline-to-2-year cartilage damage worsening in the lateral (OR = 5.35, 95% CI: 2.37–12.05) and any PF (OR = 2.99, 95% CI: 1.27–7.04) compartment. Individual components of baseline DJS (i.e., change in knee moment or angle) were not associated with subsequent PF disease worsening. Conclusion Capturing the concomitant effect of knee kinetics and kinematics during gait, knee sagittal DJS is a potentially modifiable risk factor for PF disease worsening.

AB - Objective Knee sagittal dynamic joint stiffness (DJS) describes the biomechanical interaction between change in external knee flexion moment and flexion angular excursion during gait. In theory, greater DJS may particularly stress the patellofemoral (PF) compartment and thereby contribute to PF osteoarthritis (OA) worsening. We hypothesized that greater baseline knee sagittal DJS is associated with PF cartilage damage worsening 2 years later. Methods Participants all had OA in at least one knee. Knee kinematics and kinetics during gait were recorded using motion capture systems and force plates. Knee sagittal DJS was computed as the slope of the linear regression line for knee flexion moments vs angles during the loading response phase. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained at baseline and 2 years later. We assessed the association between baseline DJS and baseline-to-2-year PF cartilage damage worsening using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Our sample had 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); body mass index (BMI) 28.4 kg/m 2 (5.7); 76.5% women. Baseline knee sagittal DJS was associated with baseline-to-2-year cartilage damage worsening in the lateral (OR = 5.35, 95% CI: 2.37–12.05) and any PF (OR = 2.99, 95% CI: 1.27–7.04) compartment. Individual components of baseline DJS (i.e., change in knee moment or angle) were not associated with subsequent PF disease worsening. Conclusion Capturing the concomitant effect of knee kinetics and kinematics during gait, knee sagittal DJS is a potentially modifiable risk factor for PF disease worsening.

KW - Cartilage

KW - Gait

KW - Imaging

KW - Knee osteoarthritis

KW - Magnetic resonance

KW - Patellofemoral joint

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994030180&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84994030180&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.joca.2016.10.004

DO - 10.1016/j.joca.2016.10.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 27729289

AN - SCOPUS:84994030180

VL - 25

SP - 242

EP - 248

JO - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

JF - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

SN - 1063-4584

IS - 2

ER -