Association of glucose metabolism and blood pressure during pregnancy with subsequent maternal blood pressure

M. Maresh, J. M. Lawrence, D. M. Scholtens, A. Kuang, L. P. Lowe, C. Deerochanawong, D. A. Sacks, W. L. Lowe, A. R. Dyer, B. E. Metzger*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The goal of this study was to examine associations of measures of maternal glucose metabolism and blood pressure during pregnancy with blood pressure at follow-up in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) cohort. The HAPO Follow-Up Study included 4747 women who had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at ~28 weeks’ gestation. Of these, 4572 women who did not have chronic hypertension during their pregnancy or other excluding factors, had blood pressure evaluation 10–14 years after the birth of their HAPO child. Primary outcomes were systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and hypertension (SBP ≥ 140 and/or DBP ≥ 90 or treatment for hypertension) at follow-up. Blood pressure during pregnancy was associated with all blood pressure outcomes at follow-up independent of glucose and insulin sensitivity during pregnancy. The sum of glucose z-scores was associated with blood pressure outcomes at follow-up but associations were attenuated in models that included pregnancy blood pressure measures. Associations with SBP were significant in adjusted models, while associations with DBP and hypertension were not. Insulin sensitivity during pregnancy was associated with all blood pressure outcomes at follow-up, and although attenuated after adjustments, remained statistically significant (hypertension OR 0.79, 95%CI 0.68–0.92; SBP beta −0.91, 95% CI −1.34 to −0.49; DBP beta −0.50, 95% CI −0.81 to −0.19). In conclusion, maternal glucose values at the pregnancy OGTT were not independently associated with maternal blood pressure outcomes 10–14 years postpartum; however, insulin sensitivity during pregnancy was associated independently of blood pressure, BMI, and other covariates measured during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-68
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of human hypertension
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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