Association of Organ Dysfunction Scores and Functional Outcomes following Pediatric Critical Illness

Travis J. Matics*, Neethi P. Pinto, L. Nelson Sanchez-Pinto

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality are common following pediatric critical illness. Severe organ dysfunction is associated with significant in-hospital mortality in critically ill children; however, the performance of pediatric organ dysfunction scores as predictors of functional outcomes after critical illness has not been previously assessed. Design: Secondary analysis of a prospective observational cohort. Setting: A multidisciplinary, tertiary, academic PICU. Patients: Patients less than or equal to 18 years old admitted between June 2012 and August 2012. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: The maximum pediatric Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 scores during admission were calculated. The Functional Status Scale score was obtained at baseline, 6 months and 3 years following discharge. New morbidity was defined as a change in Functional Status Scale greater than or equal to 3 points from baseline. The performance of organ dysfunction scores at discriminating new morbidity or mortality at 6 months and 3 years was measured using the area under the curve. Seventy-three patients met inclusion criteria. Fourteen percent had new morbidity or mortality at 6 months and 23% at 3 years. The performance of the maximum pediatric Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 scores at discriminating new morbidity or mortality was excellent at 6 months (areas under the curves 0.9 and 0.88, respectively) and good at 3 years (0.82 and 0.79, respectively). Conclusions: Severity of organ dysfunction is associated with longitudinal change in functional status and short-term and long-term development of new morbidity and mortality. Maximum pediatric Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 scores during critical illness have good to excellent performance at predicting new morbidity or mortality up to 3 years after critical illness. Use of these pediatric organ dysfunction scores may be helpful for prognostication of longitudinal functional outcomes in critically ill children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)722-727
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Keywords

  • critical care outcomes
  • functional status score
  • morbidity
  • organ dysfunction scores
  • pediatric
  • pediatric intensive care units

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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