Association of sleep characteristics with cardiovascular health among women and differences by race/ethnicity and menopausal status: findings from the American Heart Association Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network

Nour Makarem, Marie Pierre St-Onge, Ming Liao, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Brooke Aggarwal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objective: Sleep is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is not currently included as a cardiovascular health (CVH) metric in the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 (AHA LS7). Our objective was to evaluate the association of sleep with CVH in women and examine differences by menopausal status and race/ethnicity. Methods: Baseline data from the Columbia University AHA Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network were examined. Sleep habits were self-reported using validated questionnaires. A CVH score was computed using AHA LS7 criteria for smoking, diet, physical activity, BMI, blood pressure(BP), total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. Women received a score of 2 (ideal), 1 (intermediate), or 0 (poor) based on their level of meeting each AHA LS7 metric. Multivariable-adjusted regression models were used to evaluate associations of sleep with meeting overall and individual CVH metrics. Results: The analytical sample consisted of n = 507 women (62% minority/Hispanic, mean age:37 y). Participants with adequate sleep duration (≥7 h), good sleep quality, no insomnia nor snoring, and low risk for OSA were more likely to meet >4 of the AHA LS7 metrics (P <.01). Poorer sleep quality (β = −0.08, P =.002), higher insomnia severity (β = −0.05, P =.002), snoring (β = −0.77, P =.0001), and higher risk for OSA (β = −1.63, P <.0001) were associated with poorer CVH. Insomnia, snoring, and high OSA risk were associated with 69% to >300% higher odds of having poor CVH (P ≤.03). Associations were stronger in post-menopausal and racial/ethnic minority women. Conclusions: Better sleep habits were associated with more favorable CVH among women, suggesting that there may be benefit in incorporating sleep assessment into CVD risk screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-508
Number of pages8
JournalSleep Health
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2019

Keywords

  • AHA Life's Simple 7
  • Cardiovascular health
  • Menopausal status
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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