Association study of BDNF and DRD3 genes in schizophrenia diagnosis using matched case-control and family based study designs

Clement C. Zai, Mirko Manchia, Vincenzo De Luca, Arun K. Tiwari, Alessio Squassina, Gwyneth C. Zai, John Strauss, Sajid A. Shaikh, Natalie Freeman, Herbert Y. Meltzer, Jeffrey Lieberman, Bernard Le Foll, James L. Kennedy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder with prominent genetic etiologic factors. The dopamine receptor DRD3 gene is a strong candidate in genetic studies of SCZ because of the dopamine hypothesis of SCZ and the selective expression of D3 in areas of the limbic system implicated in the disease. We examined 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DRD3 in our sample of European origin consisting of 95 small nuclear SCZ families and 167 case-control pairs. We also examined four BDNF SNPs in our samples because of evidence for BDNF regulation of DRD3 expression (Guillin et al., 2001). We found a nominally significant genotypic association with rs7633291 and allelic association with rs1025398 alleles. However, these observations did not survive correction for multiple testing. We did not find a statistically significant association with the other DRD3 and BDNF polymorphisms. Taken together, the results from the present study suggest that BDNF and DRD3 may not be involved in SCZ susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1412-1418
Number of pages7
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Keywords

  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor BDNF
  • Candidate gene association
  • Dopamine receptor DRD3
  • Family based association study
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Biological Psychiatry

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