Associations Between Ankle-Brachial Index and Cognitive Function: Results From the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial

Research Investigators for the LIFE Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. Design: Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). Setting: Eight US academic centers. Participants: A total of 1601 adults ages 70-89 years, sedentary, without dementia, and with functional limitations. Measurements: Baseline ABI and interviewer- and computer-administered cognitive function assessments were obtained. These assessments were used to compare a physical activity intervention with a health education control. Cognitive function was reassessed 24 months later (interviewer-administered) and 18 or 30 months later (computer-administered) and central adjudication was used to classify individuals as having mild cognitive impairment, probable dementia, or neither. Results: Lower ABI had a modest independent association with poorer cognitive functioning at baseline (partial r= 0.09; P < .001). Although lower baseline ABI was not associated with overall changes in cognitive function test scores, it was associated with higher odds for 2-year progression to a composite of either mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia (odds ratio 2.60 per unit lower ABI; 95% confidence interval 1.06-6.37). Across 2 years, changes in ABI were not associated with changes in cognitive function. Conclusion: In an older cohort sedentary individuals with dementia and with functional limitations, lower baseline ABI was independently correlated with cognitive function and associated with greater 2-year risk for progression to mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)682-689
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Ankle Brachial Index
Cognition
Life Style
Dementia
Interviews
Health Education
Randomized Controlled Trials
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Ankle-brachial index
  • Cognitive function
  • Dementia
  • Peripheral artery disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Policy
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{6dfcdf5b2b6f471c88a2f3d6d52fd8e6,
title = "Associations Between Ankle-Brachial Index and Cognitive Function: Results From the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. Design: Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). Setting: Eight US academic centers. Participants: A total of 1601 adults ages 70-89 years, sedentary, without dementia, and with functional limitations. Measurements: Baseline ABI and interviewer- and computer-administered cognitive function assessments were obtained. These assessments were used to compare a physical activity intervention with a health education control. Cognitive function was reassessed 24 months later (interviewer-administered) and 18 or 30 months later (computer-administered) and central adjudication was used to classify individuals as having mild cognitive impairment, probable dementia, or neither. Results: Lower ABI had a modest independent association with poorer cognitive functioning at baseline (partial r= 0.09; P < .001). Although lower baseline ABI was not associated with overall changes in cognitive function test scores, it was associated with higher odds for 2-year progression to a composite of either mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia (odds ratio 2.60 per unit lower ABI; 95{\%} confidence interval 1.06-6.37). Across 2 years, changes in ABI were not associated with changes in cognitive function. Conclusion: In an older cohort sedentary individuals with dementia and with functional limitations, lower baseline ABI was independently correlated with cognitive function and associated with greater 2-year risk for progression to mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia.",
keywords = "Ankle-brachial index, Cognitive function, Dementia, Peripheral artery disease",
author = "{Research Investigators for the LIFE Study} and Espeland, {Mark A.} and Newman, {Anne B.} and Kaycee Sink and Gill, {Thomas M.} and King, {Abby C.} and Miller, {Michael E.} and Jack Guralnik and Jeff Katula and Timothy Church and Todd Manini and Reid, {Kieran F.} and McDermott, {Mary M.} and Marco Pahor and Christiaan Leeuwenburgh and Connie Caudle and Lauren Crump and Latonia Holmes and Jocelyn Lee and Lu, {Ching Ju} and Ambrosius, {Walter T.} and William Applegate and Beavers, {Daniel P.} and Byington, {Robert P.} and Delilah Cook and Furberg, {Curt D.} and Harvin, {Lea N.} and Leora Henkin and John Hepler and Hsu, {Fang Chi} and Laura Lovato and Wesley Roberson and Julia Rushing and Scott Rushing and Stowe, {Cynthia L.} and Walkup, {Michael P.} and Don Hire and {Jack Rejeski}, W. and Brubaker, {Peter H.} and Mihalko, {Shannon L.} and Jennings, {Janine M.} and Hadley, {Evan C.} and Sergei Romashkan and Bonds, {Denise E.} and Patel, {Kushang V.} and Bonnie Spring and Joshua Hauser and Diana Kerwin and Kathryn Domanchuk and Alvito Rego and Blair, {Steven N.}",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jamda.2015.03.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "682--689",
journal = "Journal of the American Medical Directors Association",
issn = "1525-8610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
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Associations Between Ankle-Brachial Index and Cognitive Function : Results From the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial. / Research Investigators for the LIFE Study.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 16, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 682-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations Between Ankle-Brachial Index and Cognitive Function

T2 - Results From the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial

AU - Research Investigators for the LIFE Study

AU - Espeland, Mark A.

AU - Newman, Anne B.

AU - Sink, Kaycee

AU - Gill, Thomas M.

AU - King, Abby C.

AU - Miller, Michael E.

AU - Guralnik, Jack

AU - Katula, Jeff

AU - Church, Timothy

AU - Manini, Todd

AU - Reid, Kieran F.

AU - McDermott, Mary M.

AU - Pahor, Marco

AU - Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

AU - Caudle, Connie

AU - Crump, Lauren

AU - Holmes, Latonia

AU - Lee, Jocelyn

AU - Lu, Ching Ju

AU - Ambrosius, Walter T.

AU - Applegate, William

AU - Beavers, Daniel P.

AU - Byington, Robert P.

AU - Cook, Delilah

AU - Furberg, Curt D.

AU - Harvin, Lea N.

AU - Henkin, Leora

AU - Hepler, John

AU - Hsu, Fang Chi

AU - Lovato, Laura

AU - Roberson, Wesley

AU - Rushing, Julia

AU - Rushing, Scott

AU - Stowe, Cynthia L.

AU - Walkup, Michael P.

AU - Hire, Don

AU - Jack Rejeski, W.

AU - Brubaker, Peter H.

AU - Mihalko, Shannon L.

AU - Jennings, Janine M.

AU - Hadley, Evan C.

AU - Romashkan, Sergei

AU - Bonds, Denise E.

AU - Patel, Kushang V.

AU - Spring, Bonnie

AU - Hauser, Joshua

AU - Kerwin, Diana

AU - Domanchuk, Kathryn

AU - Rego, Alvito

AU - Blair, Steven N.

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. Design: Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). Setting: Eight US academic centers. Participants: A total of 1601 adults ages 70-89 years, sedentary, without dementia, and with functional limitations. Measurements: Baseline ABI and interviewer- and computer-administered cognitive function assessments were obtained. These assessments were used to compare a physical activity intervention with a health education control. Cognitive function was reassessed 24 months later (interviewer-administered) and 18 or 30 months later (computer-administered) and central adjudication was used to classify individuals as having mild cognitive impairment, probable dementia, or neither. Results: Lower ABI had a modest independent association with poorer cognitive functioning at baseline (partial r= 0.09; P < .001). Although lower baseline ABI was not associated with overall changes in cognitive function test scores, it was associated with higher odds for 2-year progression to a composite of either mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia (odds ratio 2.60 per unit lower ABI; 95% confidence interval 1.06-6.37). Across 2 years, changes in ABI were not associated with changes in cognitive function. Conclusion: In an older cohort sedentary individuals with dementia and with functional limitations, lower baseline ABI was independently correlated with cognitive function and associated with greater 2-year risk for progression to mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia.

AB - Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. Design: Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). Setting: Eight US academic centers. Participants: A total of 1601 adults ages 70-89 years, sedentary, without dementia, and with functional limitations. Measurements: Baseline ABI and interviewer- and computer-administered cognitive function assessments were obtained. These assessments were used to compare a physical activity intervention with a health education control. Cognitive function was reassessed 24 months later (interviewer-administered) and 18 or 30 months later (computer-administered) and central adjudication was used to classify individuals as having mild cognitive impairment, probable dementia, or neither. Results: Lower ABI had a modest independent association with poorer cognitive functioning at baseline (partial r= 0.09; P < .001). Although lower baseline ABI was not associated with overall changes in cognitive function test scores, it was associated with higher odds for 2-year progression to a composite of either mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia (odds ratio 2.60 per unit lower ABI; 95% confidence interval 1.06-6.37). Across 2 years, changes in ABI were not associated with changes in cognitive function. Conclusion: In an older cohort sedentary individuals with dementia and with functional limitations, lower baseline ABI was independently correlated with cognitive function and associated with greater 2-year risk for progression to mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia.

KW - Ankle-brachial index

KW - Cognitive function

KW - Dementia

KW - Peripheral artery disease

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JO - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

JF - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

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