Associations Between Television Viewing and Adiposity Among South Asians

Yichen Jin, Loretta DiPietro, Namratha R Kandula, Alka M. Kanaya, Sameera A. Talegawkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Sedentary behaviors related to television (TV) viewing are associated with adiposity; however, few investigations have focused on South Asians, an ethnicity particularly vulnerable to metabolic perturbations. This study examined the relationships between TV viewing and adiposity in a cohort of middle-aged and older South Asians. Method: Data were obtained from Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study (N = 906; mean age [standard deviation] = 55 [9.4] years, 46% women). TV viewing hours per week was assessed through questionnaire and classified into tertiles for analysis. Multivariate linear regression models were used to examine the associations between TV viewing and measures of adiposity and body composition including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, pericardial fat volume, and visceral, subcutaneous, and inter-muscular fat area after adjusting for covariates including intentional exercise. Results: Participants who were women, older, with lower education levels, and living longer in the United States watched TV for longer periods of times. Duration of TV viewing was positively associated with BMI (p < 0.001), waist circumference (p < 0.001), visceral fat area (p = 0.001), and pericardial fat volume (p = 0.003) independent of intentional exercise. Conclusions: While studies in South Asians with a longitudinal design need to confirm our findings, our cross-sectional results indicate that reduction in TV viewing may be beneficial in reducing adiposity and maintaining a healthy body composition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1059-1062
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Television
Adiposity
television
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Waist Circumference
Body Composition
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Fats
Exercise
Atherosclerosis
ethnicity
Education
regression
questionnaire
education

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Body mass index (BMI)
  • Sedentary behavior
  • South Asians
  • Television viewing
  • Waist circumference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Jin, Yichen ; DiPietro, Loretta ; Kandula, Namratha R ; Kanaya, Alka M. ; Talegawkar, Sameera A. / Associations Between Television Viewing and Adiposity Among South Asians. In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. 2018 ; Vol. 5, No. 5. pp. 1059-1062.
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Associations Between Television Viewing and Adiposity Among South Asians. / Jin, Yichen; DiPietro, Loretta; Kandula, Namratha R; Kanaya, Alka M.; Talegawkar, Sameera A.

In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, Vol. 5, No. 5, 01.10.2018, p. 1059-1062.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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