Associations of calf skeletal muscle characteristics and peripheral nerve function with self-perceived physical functioning and walking ability in persons with peripheral artery disease

Natalie S. Evans, Kiang Liu, Michael H. Criqui, Luigi Ferrucci, Jack M. Guralnik, Tian Lu Tian, Liao Yihua Liao, Mary M. McDermott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

We determined whether more adverse calf muscle characteristics and poorer peripheral nerve function were associated with impairments in self-perceived physical functioning and walking ability in persons with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). Participants included 462 persons with PAD; measures included the ankle-brachial index (ABI), medical history, electrophysiologic characteristics of nerves, and computed tomography of calf muscle. Self-perceived physical functioning and walking ability were assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). Results were adjusted for age, sex, race, ABI, body mass index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Lower calf muscle area was associated with a poorer SF-36 physical function (PF) score (overall p-trend < 0.001, 33.76 PF score for the lowest quartile versus 59.74 for the highest, pairwise p < 0.001) and a poorer WIQ walking distance score (p-trend = 0.001, 29.71 WIQ score for the lowest quartile versus 48.43 for the highest, pairwise p < 0.001). Higher calf muscle percent fat was associated with a poorer SF-36 PF score (p-trend < 0.001, 53.76 PF score for the lowest quartile versus 40.28 for the highest, pairwise p = 0.009). Slower peroneal nerve conduction velocity was associated with a poorer WIQ speed score (p-trend = 0.023, 30.49 WIQ score for the lowest quartile versus 40.48 for the highest, pairwise p = 0.031). In summary, adverse calf muscle characteristics and poorer peripheral nerve function are associated significantly and independently with impairments in self-perceived physical functioning and walking ability in PAD persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalVascular Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Keywords

  • calf muscle characteristics
  • peripheral artery disease
  • peripheral nerve function
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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