Associations of CCR5 CCR2 and stromal cell-derived factor 1 genotypes with human immunodeficiency virus disease progression in patients receiving nucleoside therapy

Janet L. Lathey, Camlin Tierney, Sheng Yung P Chang, Richard T. D’aquila, Daniel M. Bettendorf, Heather C. Alexander, Christopher D. Santini, Angela M. Hughes, Charlene F. Barroga, Stephen A. Spector, Jeff E. Landes, Scott M. Hammer, David A. Katzenstein, S. Hammer, J. Lathey, S. Fiscus, B. Jackson, H. Farzadegan, S. Rasheed, T. ElbeikR. Reichman, A. Japour, R. D’aquila, W. Scott, B. Griffith, AIDS Clinical Trials Group 175 Virology Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Genotype data for CCR5 CCR2 and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) were obtained from 354 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-positive subjects who were being treated with nucleosides. Associations with HIV-1 load HIV syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype CD4 cell count and disease progression were analyzed. No differences in HIV-1 load or CD4 cell count were observed between wild type (+) and variant genotypes. Changes from non-SI to SI viral phenotype were more frequent in heterozygotes with a 32-bp deletion (Δ32) in the CCR5 gene than in + homozygotes (40% vs. 7%; P = .01). In a multivariate analysis heterozygous CCR5 Δ32 was associated with reduced hazard of progression (hazard ratio 0.32; P = .02). Subjects homozygous for the SDF-1 3′A variant had more-rapid disease progression (P = .008). The SDF-1 homozygous 3′A variant was related to more-rapid disease progression and CCR5 Δ32 was associated with reduced rates of hazard for disease progression in nucleoside-treated subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1402-1411
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume184
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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