Associations of Chronic Burden, Sleep Characteristics, and Metabolic Syndrome in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

Dayna A. Johnson*, Kristen Knutson, Laura A. Colangelo, Lauren Hale, Susan Redline, Mercedes Carnethon, Kiarri N. Kershaw

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective Chronic exposure to stress is associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the mechanism is unclear. We investigated the associations between chronic burden, sleep, and MetS in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. Methods Chronic burden was self-reported (2000-2001) according to experiences with stressors for longer than 6 months. Wrist actigraphy-measured sleep duration and sleep efficiency were collected for 6 days; sleep duration, sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness were self-reported (2003-2004). MetS was measured during the clinic visit, from 2005 to 2006. Multivariable logistic and Cox proportional hazard models were fit to determine the associations of interest. Mediation by sleep was assessed using the product of coefficients approach. Results Among participants (n = 606), the average (standard deviation) age was 40 (3.6) years, 58% were female, and 43% were Black. The prevalences of chronic burden, short sleep (≤6 hours), and MetS were 35%, 43% and 20.5%, respectively. High versus low chronic burden was associated with shorter self-reported sleep duration and higher daytime sleepiness. Chronic burden was associated with 1.85 higher odds (95% confidence interval = 1.11-3.09) of MetS. Sleep characteristics were not associated with MetS. There was no evidence that sleep mediated the chronic burden-MetS relation. Conclusion Burden of chronic stress may be an emerging novel risk factor for both poor sleep and MetS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-718
Number of pages8
JournalPsychosomatic medicine
Volume84
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2022

Keywords

  • Abbreviations
  • actigraphy
  • chronic stress
  • metabolic syndrome
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

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