Associations of deep sleep and obstructive sleep apnea with family relationships, life satisfaction, and physical stress experience in children: a caregiver perspective

Bharat Bhushan*, Phyllis C. Zee, Michael A. Grandner, Sarah S. Jaser, Inbal Hazkani, John Maddalozzo, Sarah Xu, Vikas Ahluwalia, Anjali Chandra, James W. Schroeder, Manoj Sharma, David A. Suittens, Cynthia A. Berg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and poor quality of sleep negatively impacts health-related quality of life in adults, but few studies have evaluated the association between sleep disturbance (eg, OSA, inadequate sleep) and health-related quality of life domains (eg, family relations, life satisfaction) in children. Methods: Children ages 8–17 years referred to a sleep center for routine polysomnography from April 2022 to August 2022 were approached to participate in the study, and children visiting the department of pediatrics for their wellness visit were recruited for comparisons. Statistical analysis was conducted using R 3.6.0. Results: Ninety-nine children were recruited from the sleep clinic, and 23 children were recruited from the primary care clinic. Of these children, 62 were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (31 mild, 12 moderate, 19 severe), and 37 did not meet criteria for a diagnosis. Health-related quality of life domains did not differ across OSA severity levels. Children in general had lower life satisfaction and higher physical stress experience compared to children visiting for their wellness examination (well-child visitors, P = .05 and P = .005, respectively). Children with severe OSA had significantly lower life satisfaction and significantly higher physical stress experience when compared with well-child visitors (P = .008 and P = .009, respectively). Correlation analysis showed that N3 (deep) sleep was positively associated with family relations and life satisfaction, while it was negatively associated with anger. Conclusions: Based on caregiver response, N3 sleep is positively associated with family relations and life satisfaction and negatively associated with anger. Severe OSA is associated with lower life satisfaction and higher physical stress experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2087-2095
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume19
Issue number12 December
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2023

Keywords

  • PROMIS
  • deep sleep
  • family relations
  • life satisfaction
  • obstructive sleep apnea
  • patient reported outcomes
  • sleep duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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