Asthma Remission Disparities Among US Youth by Sexual Identity and Race/Ethnicity, 2009-2017

Caleb W. Curry, Dylan Felt, Kristin Kan, Megan Ruprecht, Xinzi Wang, Gregory Phillips, Lauren B. Beach*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Sexual minority and racial/ethnic minority youth experience a higher burden of asthma. The frameworks of minority stress theory and intersectionality suggest that sexual minority and racial/ethnic minority youth may experience disparities in nonremitting asthma. Objective: To examine adjusted odds of nonremitting asthma by sexual identity, race/ethnicity, and their intersections, along with their relationship with traditional nonremitting asthma risk factors (weight status and smoking) and victimization (bullying, cyberbullying, and forced sex). Methods: We used data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey pooled across 41 jurisdiction-years (biennially, 2009-2017), resulting in a sample of 21,789 US youth. The prevalence of nonremitting asthma was examined by sexual identity, race/ethnicity, and their intersections, stratified by sex. Bivariate associations and backward logistic regression models, stratified by sex, were built to examine nonremitting asthma disparities and the effects of selected traditional correlates and victimization variables. Results: At the intersections, 8 sexual minority and racial/ethnic minority subpopulations were significantly more likely to have nonremitting asthma compared with White heterosexual sex-matched peers. White gay males and Black lesbian females had the highest odds of nonremitting asthma. Traditional risks of nonremitting asthma and victimization were associated with attenuated odds of nonremitting asthma. Conclusions: Many sexual minority and racial/ethnic youth subpopulations are more likely to have nonremitting asthma. Evidence suggests that traditional nonremitting asthma risk factors and victimization may partly explain disparities in nonremitting asthma. Asthma management guidelines should be updated to include population health disparities of sexual and racial/ethnic minorities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3396-3406
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Asthma remission
  • Disparities
  • Intersectionality
  • Minority stress
  • Nonremitting asthma
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Sexual identity
  • Sexual minorities
  • United States
  • Victimization
  • YRBS
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

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