At-risk drinking in an HMO primary care sample: Prevalence and health policy implications

Michael F. Fleming*, Linda Baier Manwell, Kristen Lawton Barry, Kristen Johnson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of at- risk drinking using varying alcohol use criteria. Methods. A period prevalence survey was conducted in 22 primary care practices (n = 19 372 adults). Results. The frequency of at-risk alcohol use varied from 7.5% (World Health Organization criteria) to 19.7% (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism criteria). A stepwise logistic model using National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism criteria found male gender, current tobacco use, never married status, retirement, and unemployment to be significant predictors of at-risk alcohol use. Conclusions. Public health policy needs to move to a primary care paradigm focusing on identification and treatment of at-risk drinkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-93
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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