Attributional style and self-esteem: The prediction of emotional distress following a midterm exam

John A. Ralph, Susan Mineka*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

A midterm design was used to determine whether students' attributional style for negative achievement events interacts with self-esteem and a lower- than-expected exam grade to predict changes in measures of specific and nonspecific depression and anxiety. Participants were 141 students who completed baseline measures of attributional style and self-esteem, as well as effective measures on several occasions before and after recipient of midterm grades. A pessimistic attributional style for negative events interacted with self-esteem and outcome to predict residual changes in a combined measure of nonspecific distress and anxious arousal (marginal trend) but not a combined measure of specific depressive symptoms. Unexpectedly, the greatest residual increases in distress occurred among low-self-esteem pessimists who experienced a nonfailure outcome. These effects did not appear to be mediated by changes in hopelessness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-215
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of abnormal psychology
Volume107
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attributional style and self-esteem: The prediction of emotional distress following a midterm exam'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this