Auditory Reserve and the Legacy of Auditory Experience

Erika Skoe, Nina Kraus*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Musical training during childhood has been linked to more robust encoding of sound later in life. We take this as evidence for an auditory reserve: a mechanism by which individuals capitalize on earlier life experiences to promote auditory processing. We assert that early auditory experiences guide how the reserve develops and is maintained over the lifetime. Experiences that occur after childhood, or which are limited in nature, are theorized to affect the reserve, although their influence on sensory processing may be less long-lasting and may potentially fade over time if not repeated. This auditory reserve may help to explain individual differences in how individuals cope with auditory impoverishment or loss of sensorineural function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-593
Number of pages19
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Auditory system
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Sensitive periods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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