Augmented replicative capacity of the boosting antigen improves the protective efficacy of heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens

Pablo Penaloza-MacMaster, Jeffrey E. Teigler, Rebecca C. Obeng, Zi H. Kang, Nicholas M. Provine, Lily Parenteau, Stephen Blackmore, Joshua Ra, Erica N. Borducchi, Dan H. Barouch*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prime-boost immunization regimens have proven efficacious at generating robust immune responses. However, whether the level of replication of the boosting antigen impacts the magnitude and protective efficacy of vaccine-elicited immune responses remains unclear. To evaluate this, we primed mice with replication-defective adenovirus vectors expressing the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein (GP), followed by boosting with either LCMV Armstrong, which is rapidly controlled, or LCMV CL-13, which leads to a more prolonged exposure to the boosting antigen. Although priming of naive mice with LCMV CL-13 normally results in T cell exhaustion and establishment of chronic infection, boosting with CL-13 resulted in potent recall CD8 T cell responses that were greater than those following boosting with LCMV Armstrong. Furthermore, following the CL-13 boost, a greater number of anamnestic CD8 T cells localized to the lymph nodes, exhibited granzyme B expression, and conferred improved protection against Listeria and vaccinia virus challenges compared with the Armstrong boost. Overall, our findings suggest that the replicative capacity of the boosting antigen influences the protective efficacy afforded by prime-boost vaccine regimens. These findings are relevant for optimizing vaccine candidates and suggest a benefit of robustly replicating vaccine vectors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6243-6254
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of virology
Volume88
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Augmented replicative capacity of the boosting antigen improves the protective efficacy of heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this