Automatically activated shame reactions and perceived legitimacy of discrimination: A longitudinal study among people with mental illness

Nicolas Rüsch*, Andrew R. Todd, Galen V. Bodenhausen, Manfred Olschewski, Patrick W. Corrigan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Perceived legitimacy of discrimination shapes reactions to mental illness stigma among stigmatized individuals. We assessed deliberately endorsed versus automatic shame-related reactions to mental illness as predictors of change in perceived legitimacy of discrimination over six months among 75 people with mental illness. Automatically activated shame-related associations with mental illness were measured using the Brief Implicit Association Test, deliberately endorsed beliefs via self-report. Controlling for depression and perceived stigma, stronger baseline automatic shame-related associations, but not deliberately endorsed beliefs, predicted higher perceived legitimacy of discrimination after six months. Automatically activated shame reactions may increase vulnerability to mental illness stigma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-63
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • Automaticity
  • Discrimination
  • Implicit Association Test
  • Perceived legitimacy
  • Shame
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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