Axial movements are relatively preserved with respect to limb movements in aphasic patients

Robert E. Hanlon*, Daniel Mattson, Jason A. Demery, Alexander W. Dromerick

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Apraxia is commonly manifested during the acute stage following left hemisphere cerebrovascular accident and typically co-occurs with aphasia. We examined 30 acute stroke patients with aphasia and apraxia in order to determine if such patients show evidence of preservation of selective subclasses of movements. Although Geschwind noted the preservation of axial movements to command in aphasic apraxic patients, his views were subsequently refuted. However, we found that aphasic apraxic patients of varying degrees of severity, including patients with global aphasia, showed relative preservation of axial movements to command and imitation. Theoretical interpretations and implications for acute neurologic rehabilitation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-741
Number of pages11
JournalCortex
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Apraxia
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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