Axon transport and neuropathy: Relevant perspectives on the etiopathogenesis of familial dysautonomia

Warren G. Tourtellotte*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peripheral neuropathies are highly prevalent and are most often associated with chronic disease, side effects from chemotherapy, or toxic-metabolic abnormalities. Neuropathies are less commonly caused by genetic mutations, but studies of the normal function of mutated proteins have identified particular vulnerabilities that often implicate mitochondrial dynamics and axon transport mechanisms. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a group of phenotypically related diseases caused by monogenic mutations that primarily affect sympathetic and sensory neurons. Here, I review evidence to indicate that many genetic neuropathies are caused by abnormalities in axon transport. Moreover, in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. There may be specific convergence on gene mutations that disrupt nerve growth factor signaling, upon which sympathetic and sensory neurons critically depend.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-499
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume186
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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