Behavioral indices of ongoing pain are largely unchanged in male mice with tissue or nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

Rochelle Urban*, Gregory Scherrer, Evan H. Goulding, Laurence H. Tecott, Allan I. Basbaum

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

108 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the impact of chronic pain on the quality of life in patients, including changes to affective state and daily life activities, rodent preclinical models rarely address this aspect of chronic pain. To better understand the behavioral consequences of the tissue and nerve injuries typically used to model neuropathic and inflammatory pain in mice, we measured home cage and affective state behaviors in animals with spared nerve injury, chronic constriction injury (CCI), or intraplantar complete Freund's adjuvant. Mechanical hypersensitivity is prominent in each of these conditions and persists for many weeks. Home cage behavior was continuously monitored for 16 days in a system that measures locomotion, feeding, and drinking, and allows for precise analysis of circadian patterns. When monitored after injury, animals with spared nerve injury and complete Freund's adjuvant behaved no differently from controls in any aspect of daily life. Animals with CCI were initially less active, but the difference between CCI and controls disappeared by 2 weeks after injury. Further, in all pain models, there was no change in any measure of affective state. We conclude that in these standard models of persistent pain, despite the development of prolonged hypersensitivity, the mice do not have significantly altered "quality of life." As alteration in daily life activities is the feature that is so disrupted in patients with chronic pain, our results suggest that the models used here do not fully reflect the human conditions and point to a need for development of a murine chronic pain model in which lifestyle changes are manifest. Mice with spared nerve injury, chronic constriction injury, and complete Freund's adjuvant injection did not alter behavior in their home cage or a battery of affective tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)990-1000
Number of pages11
JournalPain
Volume152
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Emotional behaviors
  • Inflammatory pain
  • Neuropathic pain
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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