Behavioral problems in perinatally HIV-infected young children with early antiretroviral therapy and HIV-exposed uninfected young children: prevalence and associated factors

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Abstract

Although behavioral problems have been observed in children and adolescents with perinatally-acquired HIV infection (PHIV), behavioral information regarding younger PHIV children are scarce. This study aims to identify behavioral problems in PHIV and HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) children and to evaluate factors associated with such problems. A prospective study of PHIV and HEU young children was conducted. Behavioral problems were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at baseline and 12 months later among children aged 18–60 months old. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Parenting Styles & Dimensions Questionnaire identified primary caregivers’ symptoms of depression and parenting styles, respectively, at both visits. Chi-squared analyses were used to compare the prevalence of behavioral problems between groups. Factors associated with behavioral problems were analyzed by logistic regression. From 2016 to 2017, 121 children (41 PHIV and 80 HEU) were assessed with no significant differences in prevalence of Total, Internalizing, Externalizing, and Syndrome scales problems between PHIV and HEU at both visits (p > 0.5). Primary caregivers’ depression and lower education in addition to authoritarian and permissive parenting styles were significantly related to child behavioral problems. Family-centered care for families affected by HIV, including positive parenting promotion, mental health care, and education are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-437
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2020

Keywords

  • HIV exposed uninfected children
  • Perinatally HIV infected children
  • behavioral problems
  • depression
  • parenting style

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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