Benchmarking health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer versus other cancers and United States normative data

Sneha Goswami, Michael Mongelli, Benjamin J. Peipert, Irene Helenowski, Susan Yount, Cord Sturgeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Thyroid cancer survivors may experience long-lasting physical, psychosocial, and financial challenges. No previous studies have compared health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer survivors to United States normative data and patient-reported outcomes from other types of cancers. We hypothesized that thyroid cancer survivors would report health-related quality of life poorer than the general United States population but similar to individuals with other cancers. Methods: Thyroid cancer survivors were recruited online January2017–June 2017. Individuals completed a two-part questionnaire to assess clinical characteristics and health-related quality of life, using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System T-scores obtained from the literature were compared with United States normative data and T-scores from patients with breast, prostate, uterine, cervical, colorectal, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and lung cancers. Results: A total of 1,743 US respondents completed the survey. Thyroid cancer survivors reported statistically significantly worse health-related quality of life across all seven Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains compared with United States normative data (P <.05). Surveyed individuals reported statistically significantly worse scores for anxiety, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbance than respondents from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast, colorectal, uterine, and prostate cancer cohorts (P <.01) but less pain and greater physical functioning than most other groups in this comparison (P <.01). Conclusion: The importance of health-related quality of life among thyroid cancer survivors should not be obscured by the relatively high survival rate of thyroid cancer compared with other cancers. Our results demonstrate that thyroid cancer survivors may be encumbered with greater psychologic and social burdens than survivors of several cancers that have a worse prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)986-992
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume164
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Benchmarking
Thyroid Neoplasms
Survivors
Quality of Life
Neoplasms
Information Systems
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Uterine Neoplasms
Fatigue
Prostate
Colorectal Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Sleep
Breast
Survival Rate
Anxiety
Depression
Breast Neoplasms
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Goswami, Sneha ; Mongelli, Michael ; Peipert, Benjamin J. ; Helenowski, Irene ; Yount, Susan ; Sturgeon, Cord. / Benchmarking health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer versus other cancers and United States normative data. In: Surgery (United States). 2018 ; Vol. 164, No. 5. pp. 986-992.
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Benchmarking health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer versus other cancers and United States normative data. / Goswami, Sneha; Mongelli, Michael; Peipert, Benjamin J.; Helenowski, Irene; Yount, Susan; Sturgeon, Cord.

In: Surgery (United States), Vol. 164, No. 5, 01.11.2018, p. 986-992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Benchmarking health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer versus other cancers and United States normative data

AU - Goswami, Sneha

AU - Mongelli, Michael

AU - Peipert, Benjamin J.

AU - Helenowski, Irene

AU - Yount, Susan

AU - Sturgeon, Cord

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N2 - Background: Thyroid cancer survivors may experience long-lasting physical, psychosocial, and financial challenges. No previous studies have compared health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer survivors to United States normative data and patient-reported outcomes from other types of cancers. We hypothesized that thyroid cancer survivors would report health-related quality of life poorer than the general United States population but similar to individuals with other cancers. Methods: Thyroid cancer survivors were recruited online January2017–June 2017. Individuals completed a two-part questionnaire to assess clinical characteristics and health-related quality of life, using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System T-scores obtained from the literature were compared with United States normative data and T-scores from patients with breast, prostate, uterine, cervical, colorectal, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and lung cancers. Results: A total of 1,743 US respondents completed the survey. Thyroid cancer survivors reported statistically significantly worse health-related quality of life across all seven Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains compared with United States normative data (P <.05). Surveyed individuals reported statistically significantly worse scores for anxiety, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbance than respondents from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast, colorectal, uterine, and prostate cancer cohorts (P <.01) but less pain and greater physical functioning than most other groups in this comparison (P <.01). Conclusion: The importance of health-related quality of life among thyroid cancer survivors should not be obscured by the relatively high survival rate of thyroid cancer compared with other cancers. Our results demonstrate that thyroid cancer survivors may be encumbered with greater psychologic and social burdens than survivors of several cancers that have a worse prognosis.

AB - Background: Thyroid cancer survivors may experience long-lasting physical, psychosocial, and financial challenges. No previous studies have compared health-related quality of life in thyroid cancer survivors to United States normative data and patient-reported outcomes from other types of cancers. We hypothesized that thyroid cancer survivors would report health-related quality of life poorer than the general United States population but similar to individuals with other cancers. Methods: Thyroid cancer survivors were recruited online January2017–June 2017. Individuals completed a two-part questionnaire to assess clinical characteristics and health-related quality of life, using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System T-scores obtained from the literature were compared with United States normative data and T-scores from patients with breast, prostate, uterine, cervical, colorectal, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and lung cancers. Results: A total of 1,743 US respondents completed the survey. Thyroid cancer survivors reported statistically significantly worse health-related quality of life across all seven Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains compared with United States normative data (P <.05). Surveyed individuals reported statistically significantly worse scores for anxiety, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbance than respondents from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast, colorectal, uterine, and prostate cancer cohorts (P <.01) but less pain and greater physical functioning than most other groups in this comparison (P <.01). Conclusion: The importance of health-related quality of life among thyroid cancer survivors should not be obscured by the relatively high survival rate of thyroid cancer compared with other cancers. Our results demonstrate that thyroid cancer survivors may be encumbered with greater psychologic and social burdens than survivors of several cancers that have a worse prognosis.

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