Benefits of a joint health sciences practicum for students in library and information sciences: A case report

Rebecca Raszewski, Jonna Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A joint practicum gives library and information science (LIS) students the opportunity to compare two health sciences libraries’ structures and workflows. The goal of this case report is to describe how a joint health sciences practicum can help LIS students and recent graduates develop skills that may be beneficial for their future positions in health sciences or other libraries. Case Presentation: Six participants in a joint health sciences library practicum underwent two interviews: the first interview focused on their practicum experiences, and the second interview sought to determine whether the participants had found employment and were using any skills in their new positions that they acquired during their practicums. Participants gave mostly positive feedback regarding their practicum experiences and expressed openness to applying for health sciences library positions. Although the participants who found employment did not work in health sciences libraries, their practicum projects served as supporting materials for their job applications, and they were using the skills they had gained from their practicums in their new positions. Conclusions: While most joint practicum participants were not working in a health sciences library, the practicum was beneficial to their new careers. This case report highlights that a joint health sciences practicum program can be beneficial in showing LIS students different approaches to health sciences librarianship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Medical Library Association
Volume108
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Library and Information Sciences

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