Bidirectional pathways between relational aggression and temperament from late childhood to adolescence

Olivia E. Atherton*, Jennifer L. Tackett, Emilio Ferrer, Richard W. Robins

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Relational aggression is linked to numerous adverse consequences. However, we know little about how temperament leads individuals to become perpetrators/victims of relational aggression, or how being a perpetrator/victim influences the development of temperament. We used longitudinal data from 674 Mexican-origin youth to examine relations between relational aggression and mother- and child-reported temperament from 5th grade (Mage = 10.8; SD = 0.60) through 11th grade (Mage = 16.8; SD = 0.50). Results show that(a) high Negative Emotionality and low Effortful Control predicted increases in victimization; (b) low Effortful Control predicted increases in perpetration; (c) victims increased in Negative Emotionality and decreased in Effortful Control; and (d) perpetrators increased in Negative Emotionality and Surgency. Thus, temperament serves as both an antecedent to and a consequence of relational aggression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-84
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Childhood
  • Longitudinal
  • Personality
  • Relational aggression
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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