Biopsy of men with PSA level of 2.6 to 4.0 ng/mL associated with favorable pathologic features and PSA progression rate: A preliminary analysis

Hui Zhu, Kimberly A. Roehl, Jo Ann V. Antenor, William J. Catalona*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To compare the pathologic outcomes and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression rates of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy because of prostate cancers and whose cancer was detected at a PSA level of 2.6 to 4.0 ng/mL versus those with cancer detected after the PSA level rose to greater than 4.0 ng/mL. Some studies have suggested that clinically significant prostate cancer is detected more frequently in an organ-confined stage with a PSA level between 2.6 and 4.0 ng/mL than with a PSA level greater than 4 ng/mL. However, it is uncertain whether this will affect clinical outcomes. Methods. From 1991 to 2001, 20,788 men enrolled in a prostate cancer screening study had an initial PSA level of less than 2.6 ng/mL. Of these patients, 523 had a PSA level that rose to greater than 2.5 ng/mL and had prostate cancer detected. Of the 297 patients who subsequently underwent radical prostatectomy, 223 had a preoperative PSA level of 2.6 to 4.0 ng/mL and 74 had a preoperative PSA level greater than 4.0 ng/mL. The median follow-up was 4 years. The pathologic stage, mean tumor volume, Gleason score, possibly insignificant cancer rate, possibly rapidly progressive cancer rate, and PSA progression rate were compared between the two groups. Results. The patients with a preoperative PSA level between 2.6 and 4.0 ng/mL had more favorable pathologic outcomes in terms of cancer volume, pathologic stage, and possibly rapidly progressive cancer rate. The possibly insignificant cancer rates were not different between the groups. A trend was noted for patients with a preoperative PSA level between 2.6 and 4.0 ng/mL to have a lower PSA progression rate. Conclusions. Biopsy in men with PSA levels between 2.6 and 4.0 ng/mL may detect clinically significant prostate cancer more frequently at an organ-confined stage, with a lower PSA progression rate. Additional study in a larger population with longer follow-up is needed to confirm this trend.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-551
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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