Bioscience indications for chronic disease management and neuromedical interventions following traumatic brain injury

Mark J. Ashley, Grace S. Griesbach, David Lawrence Ripley, Matthew J. Ashley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Rehabilitation for acquired brain injury (ABI) has focused largely on alleviation of physical, cognitive, communicative, neurobehavioral, and psychological deficits arising from the injury. Recently, ABI has come to be viewed as a chronic disease and, more probably, a collection of various diseases. Increasingly, there is concern that brain injury may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative conditions as well as to acceleration of what may be genetically predisposed neurological diseases.1 - 15 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is implicated in epilepsy, stroke, brain cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Further, hypothalamic and pituitary damage can result in a wide variety of neuroendocrine disorders.16 - 21.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTraumatic Brain Injury
Subtitle of host publicationRehabilitation, Treatment, and Case Management, Fourth Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages3-30
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781498710329
ISBN (Print)9781498710299
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Ashley, M. J., Griesbach, G. S., Ripley, D. L., & Ashley, M. J. (2017). Bioscience indications for chronic disease management and neuromedical interventions following traumatic brain injury. In Traumatic Brain Injury: Rehabilitation, Treatment, and Case Management, Fourth Edition (pp. 3-30). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781315371351