Black neighbors, higher crime? The role of racial stereotypes in evaluations of neighborhood crime

Lincoln Quillian*, Devah Pager

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

421 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article investigates the relationship between neighborhood racial composition and perceptions residents have of their neighborhood's level of crime. The study uses questions about perceptions of neighborhood crime from surveys in Chicago, Seattle, and Baltimore, matched with census data and police department crime statistics. The percentage young black men in a neighborhood is positively associated with perceptions of the neighborhood crime level, even after controlling for two measures of crime rates and other neighborhood characteristics. This supports the view that stereotypes are influencing perceptions of neighborhood crime levels. Variation in effects by race of the perceiver and implications for racial segregation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-767
Number of pages51
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Black neighbors, higher crime? The role of racial stereotypes in evaluations of neighborhood crime'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this