Blocking platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM) inhibits disease progression and prevents joint erosion in established collagen antibody-induced arthritis

Bidisha Dasgupta, Tina Chew, Alana deRoche, William A. Muller*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Collagen antibody-induced arthritis is a robust murine model of arthritis that histologically recapitulates the inflammatory characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis including pannus formation and destruction of articular cartilage and bone. PECAM is a molecule expressed by both leukocytes and endothelial cells that has been shown to play a major role in the extravasation of leukocytes into sites of inflammation. Genetic deletion of many molecules will blunt the onset and progression of arthritis in murine models, as will administration of various anti-inflammatory therapies given prior to the onset of disease. However, patients seek medical attention when symptomatic, which means that the disease is well established. We investigated whether blocking PECAM interactions would inhibit progression of established disease in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis model. We report that treatment of symptomatic mice with a PECAM-Fc chimera significantly reduced inflammation and virtually eliminated cartilage and bone destruction. The results suggest that therapies that block PECAM function may be beneficial in the treatment of established arthritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-215
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Inflammation
  • Leukocyte
  • Mouse model
  • PECAM
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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