Body mass index in young adults: Associations with parental body size and education in the CARDIA study

Kurt J. Greenlund, Kiang Liu*, Alan R. Dyer, Catarina I. Kiefe, Gregory L. Burke, Carlo Yunis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. Associations of parental education, parental body size, and offspring's education with body mass index and 7-year change in body mass index were examined among participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Methods. CARDIA is a study of coronary artery disease risk factors in 5115 Black and White persons aged 18 to 30 at baseline. Analyses of covariance were carried out with body mass index and change in body mass index as the dependent variables, and with parental education, parental body size, and participant education as the major independent variables. Results. Father's body size was positively associated with participant's baseline body mass index among Black men, White men, and White women. Mother's body size was positively associated with baseline body mass index among all race-sex groups, and with change in body mass index among White women. Father's education was inversely associated with baseline body mass index among Black men and White women, and with change among White women. Conclusions. Parental education may influence body mass index and changes in young adulthood, especially among White women. Such associations may be both genetic and environmental and may be important for obesity prevention efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-484
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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