Bone marrow-derived immature myeloid cells are a main source of circulating suPAR contributing to proteinuric kidney disease

Eunsil Hahm, Changli Wei, Isabel Fernandez, Jing Li, Nicholas J. Tardi, Melissa Tracy, Shikha Wadhwani, Yanxia Cao, Vasil Peev, Andrew Zloza, Jevgenijs Lusciks, Salim S. Hayek, Christopher O'Connor, Markus Bitzer, Vineet Gupta, Sanja Sever, David B. Sykes, David T. Scadden, Jochen Reiser*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Excess levels of protein in urine (proteinuria) is a hallmark of kidney disease that typically occurs in conjunction with diabetes, hypertension, gene mutations, toxins or infections but may also be of unknown cause (idiopathic). Systemic soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a circulating factor implicated in the onset and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The cellular source(s) of elevated suPAR associated with future and progressing kidney disease is unclear, but is likely extra-renal, as the pathological uPAR is circulating and FSGS can recur even after a damaged kidney is replaced with a healthy donor organ. Here we report that bone marrow (BM) Gr-1 lo immature myeloid cells are responsible for the elevated, pathological levels of suPAR, as evidenced by BM chimera and BM ablation and cell transfer studies. A marked increase of Gr-1 lo myeloid cells was commonly found in the BM of proteinuric animals having high suPAR, and these cells efficiently transmit proteinuria when transferred to healthy mice. In accordance with the results seen in suPAR-associated proteinuric animal models, in which kidney damage is caused not by local podocyte-selective injury but more likely by systemic insults, a humanized xenograft model of FSGS resulted in an expansion of Gr-1 lo cells in the BM, leading to high plasma suPAR and proteinuric kidney disease. Together, these results identify suPAR as a functional connection between the BM and the kidney, and they implicate BM immature myeloid cells as a key contributor to glomerular dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-106
Number of pages7
JournalNature Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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    Hahm, E., Wei, C., Fernandez, I., Li, J., Tardi, N. J., Tracy, M., Wadhwani, S., Cao, Y., Peev, V., Zloza, A., Lusciks, J., Hayek, S. S., O'Connor, C., Bitzer, M., Gupta, V., Sever, S., Sykes, D. B., Scadden, D. T., & Reiser, J. (2017). Bone marrow-derived immature myeloid cells are a main source of circulating suPAR contributing to proteinuric kidney disease. Nature Medicine, 23(1), 100-106. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.4242