Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults

Chelsea N. Wong*, Laura Chaddock-Heyman, Michelle W. Voss, Agnieszka Z. Burzynska, Chandramallika Basak, Kirk I. Erickson, Ruchika Shaurya Prakash, Amanda N. Szabo-Reed, Siobhan M. Phillips, Thomas Wojcicki, Emily L. Mailey, Edward McAuley, Arthur F. Kramer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Higher cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with better cognitive performance and enhanced brain activation. Yet, the extent to which cardiorespiratory fitness-related brain activation is associated with better cognitive performance is not well understood. In this cross-sectional study, we examined whether the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and executive function was mediated by greater prefrontal cortex activation in healthy older adults. Brain activation was measured during dual-task performance with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a sample of 128 healthy older adults (59-80 years). Higher cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with greater activation during dual-task processing in several brain areas including the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortex (ACC/SMA), thalamus and basal ganglia, right motor/somatosensory cortex and middle frontal gyrus, and left somatosensory cortex, controlling for age, sex, education, and gray matter volume. Of these regions, greater ACC/SMA activation mediated the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and dual-task performance. We provide novel evidence that cardiorespiratory fitness may support cognitive performance by facilitating brain activation in a core region critical for executive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number154
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume7
Issue numberJUL
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Brain
Somatosensory Cortex
Executive Function
Motor Cortex
Task Performance and Analysis
Sex Education
Gyrus Cinguli
Basal Ganglia
Prefrontal Cortex
Thalamus
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Dual-task
  • Executive function
  • Exercise
  • fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Wong, C. N., Chaddock-Heyman, L., Voss, M. W., Burzynska, A. Z., Basak, C., Erickson, K. I., ... Kramer, A. F. (2015). Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7(JUL), [154]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00154
Wong, Chelsea N. ; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura ; Voss, Michelle W. ; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z. ; Basak, Chandramallika ; Erickson, Kirk I. ; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya ; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N. ; Phillips, Siobhan M. ; Wojcicki, Thomas ; Mailey, Emily L. ; McAuley, Edward ; Kramer, Arthur F. / Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults. In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. JUL.
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author = "Wong, {Chelsea N.} and Laura Chaddock-Heyman and Voss, {Michelle W.} and Burzynska, {Agnieszka Z.} and Chandramallika Basak and Erickson, {Kirk I.} and Prakash, {Ruchika Shaurya} and Szabo-Reed, {Amanda N.} and Phillips, {Siobhan M.} and Thomas Wojcicki and Mailey, {Emily L.} and Edward McAuley and Kramer, {Arthur F.}",
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Wong, CN, Chaddock-Heyman, L, Voss, MW, Burzynska, AZ, Basak, C, Erickson, KI, Prakash, RS, Szabo-Reed, AN, Phillips, SM, Wojcicki, T, Mailey, EL, McAuley, E & Kramer, AF 2015, 'Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, vol. 7, no. JUL, 154. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00154

Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults. / Wong, Chelsea N.; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Voss, Michelle W.; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.; Basak, Chandramallika; Erickson, Kirk I.; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N.; Phillips, Siobhan M.; Wojcicki, Thomas; Mailey, Emily L.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Vol. 7, No. JUL, 154, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Wong, Chelsea N.

AU - Chaddock-Heyman, Laura

AU - Voss, Michelle W.

AU - Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.

AU - Basak, Chandramallika

AU - Erickson, Kirk I.

AU - Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

AU - Szabo-Reed, Amanda N.

AU - Phillips, Siobhan M.

AU - Wojcicki, Thomas

AU - Mailey, Emily L.

AU - McAuley, Edward

AU - Kramer, Arthur F.

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KW - Executive function

KW - Exercise

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