Brain pathology of a patient 7 years after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple sclerosis

Annette Wundes*, James D. Bowen, George H. Kraft, Kenneth R. Maravilla, Bernadette McLaughlin, Gloria von Geldern, George Georges, Richard A. Nash, Jian Qiang Lu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aggressive immunosuppression followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) can be an effective treatment for severe multiple sclerosis (MS), but not all stages of disease may benefit equally. The case of a 49-year-old woman with advanced secondary-progressive MS whose clinical course was not improved by aHSCT and who seven years after transplantation succumbed to complications of severe MS disease-related disability is presented. Autopsy findings of ongoing neurodegeneration despite only rare infiltrating T-lymphocytes illustrate that late MS disease may not represent a suitable disease stage for aHSCT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-341
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume373
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2017

Keywords

  • Demyelination
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neuropathology
  • Stem cell transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

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