Breast cancer survivors’ preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions

Siobhan M Phillips*, David E. Conroy, Sarah Kozey Keadle, Christine Ann Pellegrini, Gillian R. Lloyd, Frank J Penedo, Bonnie Spring

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore breast cancer survivors’ interest in and preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions. Methods: Post-treatment survivors [n = 279; Mage = 60.7 (SD = 9.7)] completed a battery of online questionnaires in August 2015. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all data. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between survivors’ interest in a technology-supported exercise interventions and demographic, disease, and behavioral factors. These same factors were examined in relation to perceived effectiveness of such interventions using multiple regression analyses. Results: About half (53.4%) of survivors self-reported meeting public health recommendations for physical activity. Fewer than half reported using an exercise or diet mobile app (41.2%) or owning an activity tracker (40.5%). The majority were interested in receiving remotely delivered exercise counseling (84.6%), participating in a remotely delivered exercise intervention (79.5%), and using an exercise app or website (68%). Survivors reported that the most helpful technology-supported intervention components would be an activity tracker (89.5%), personalized feedback (81.2%), and feedback on how exercise is influencing mood, fatigue, etc. (73.6%). Components rated as least helpful were social networking integration (31.2%), group competitions (33.9%), and ability to see others’ progress (35.1%). Conclusions: Preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions varied among breast cancer survivors. Nonetheless, data indicate that technology-supported interventions may be feasible and acceptable. Engaging stakeholders may be important in developing and testing potential intervention components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3243-3252
Number of pages10
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Survivors
Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Technology
Regression Analysis
Mobile Applications
Social Networking
Aptitude
Fatigue
Counseling
Public Health
Logistic Models
Demography
Diet

Keywords

  • Breast cancer survivors
  • Interventions
  • Physical activity
  • Physical exercise
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Phillips, Siobhan M ; Conroy, David E. ; Keadle, Sarah Kozey ; Pellegrini, Christine Ann ; Lloyd, Gillian R. ; Penedo, Frank J ; Spring, Bonnie. / Breast cancer survivors’ preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 3243-3252.
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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore breast cancer survivors’ interest in and preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions. Methods: Post-treatment survivors [n = 279; Mage = 60.7 (SD = 9.7)] completed a battery of online questionnaires in August 2015. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all data. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between survivors’ interest in a technology-supported exercise interventions and demographic, disease, and behavioral factors. These same factors were examined in relation to perceived effectiveness of such interventions using multiple regression analyses. Results: About half (53.4{\%}) of survivors self-reported meeting public health recommendations for physical activity. Fewer than half reported using an exercise or diet mobile app (41.2{\%}) or owning an activity tracker (40.5{\%}). The majority were interested in receiving remotely delivered exercise counseling (84.6{\%}), participating in a remotely delivered exercise intervention (79.5{\%}), and using an exercise app or website (68{\%}). Survivors reported that the most helpful technology-supported intervention components would be an activity tracker (89.5{\%}), personalized feedback (81.2{\%}), and feedback on how exercise is influencing mood, fatigue, etc. (73.6{\%}). Components rated as least helpful were social networking integration (31.2{\%}), group competitions (33.9{\%}), and ability to see others’ progress (35.1{\%}). Conclusions: Preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions varied among breast cancer survivors. Nonetheless, data indicate that technology-supported interventions may be feasible and acceptable. Engaging stakeholders may be important in developing and testing potential intervention components.",
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Breast cancer survivors’ preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions. / Phillips, Siobhan M; Conroy, David E.; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Pellegrini, Christine Ann; Lloyd, Gillian R.; Penedo, Frank J; Spring, Bonnie.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 25, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 3243-3252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Keadle, Sarah Kozey

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