Breeding system and inbreeding depression in the rare orchid, Platanthera praeclara, in a fragmented grassland landscape

Steven E. Travers*, Kirk Anderson, Pati Vitt, Marion O. Harris

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

An important consequence of self-compatibility in plants is that self-pollination can have deleterious effects on plant fitness because of inbreeding.Weconducted a hand pollination experiment under field conditions to measure the magnitude of inbreeding depression associated with self-pollination in the rare western prairie fringed-orchid Platanthera praeclara Sheviak and Bowles. By comparing capsules and seeds resulting from cross versus self-pollination treatments, we determined that self-pollination reduces seed quality while having no detectable effect on capsule production or seed numbers. A smaller percentage of seeds resulting from selfpollination contained an embryo (18%) relative to seeds from cross-pollination (46%). Seeds that had an embryo were scored for the size of the embryo, small or large. A smaller proportion of seeds from self-pollination contained a large embryo (75%) relative to seeds from cross-pollination (92%). These results suggest that sexual reproduction and recruitment in this rare plant are dependent on the frequency of pollinator visitations that result in outcrossing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-159
Number of pages9
JournalBotany
Volume96
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Inbreeding
  • Orchid
  • Plant breeding systems
  • Plant conservation
  • Self-pollination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Plant Science

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