Bridging home and school literacies: Models for culturally responsive teaching, a case for african-american english

Carol D. Lee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The attributes Morrison identifies include “an affective and participatory relationship between the artist…and the audience,” the influence of superstition and magic as ways of knowing, and the presence of ancestors as characters, narrators, elders, a pervasive and timeless presence who act as a kind of chorus. In the first three paragraphs of the opening of The Bluest Eye, Morrison “signifies” on or critiques a set of cultural assumptions that lie beneath the 1950s Dick and Jane basal readers. Signifying is a form of discourse within the African-American English speech community. It involves critique and often sarcastic or ironic commentary couched in language that is highly figurative and makes use of creative plays on the sounds and rhythms of words. Her opening “Quiet as it’s Kept,” with its vernacular expression, invites an intimate listener. Her invocation of magic, saying “the right words over them” recalls the role of superstition and magic in the folk beliefs of traditional southern African-American culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Research on Teaching Literacy Through the Communicative and Visual Arts
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages335-345
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781135603700
ISBN (Print)9780805853797
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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